Website Design

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Video Storytelling

The ability to tell a good story with video is a difficult yet important skill for journalists and communicators to learn. Video is not just on TV anymore — you can find video stories online and on mobile devices as well. You’ll work in teams of two for this project. Let’s partner up and review the instructions for Blog Post 10 – Video Storytelling.

Important video to watch if you’re shooting with your iPhone.

1. Pre-Production (Before You Shoot)

Choose a story (or event!) that is well suited for video. This includes stories that have strong visual components and that have any sort of motion.

Identify your sources. Seek out multiple and diverse perspectives for your story.

Write preliminary interview questions after researching the story. Plan out your questions, story focus, and narrative (i.e., beginning, middle, and end) in advance, as much as you can. However, also remember to be adaptable during the interview and ask appropriate follow-up questions.

“Show me, don’t tell me” is the mantra in video storytelling. Find a way to show a story unfolding with video. Minimize the on-camera interviews with people (i.e., “talking head interviews”). It’s more interesting to watch an event occur rather than here about it from an interviewee.

Plan to shoot a variety of angles and types of shots. For suggestions, see Production, below.

Consider how you (the reporter) will fit into the story. Will you appear on-camera to set the scene or conduct an interview? If you’d like to try that, go ahead! Or, will you be completely invisible to the audience, just like you were during the Soundslides project and the audio profile project? Or, will you narrate the story without appearing on-camera?

2. Production (When You’re On-Location)

Plan on shooting before and after the event (if shooting an event). This ensures you have a variety of material to create your edited story from. Also, it helps develop a narrative of before, during, and after the event.

Shoot B-roll. B-roll is supplemental footage that relates to your story. For example, a video story about the the UW track team’s meet should include video of athletes warming up, tying their shoelaces, talking with coaches, etc. These are the shots that you can use to fill time while an interviewee is talking or while ambient noise (e.g., background noise from the event or music) is playing. For a 2-minute story, shoot at least 30 seconds of B-roll footage.

Shoot on-camera interviews with your sources. When shooting interviews, remember to look around at your surroundings. Is it relevant to the story? Can you move somewhere else to get the interview that is not as chaotic or loud? Just as with the audio interviews, encourage your sources to relax, act natural, and provide context to the answer they are giving to your question. Don’t be afraid to re-shoot a question and ask a question again. Oftentimes, the source gives a better and more eloquent answer to your question the second time you ask it.

Optional: Shoot on-camera reporters. If you’d like to appear on-camera as a broadcaster at some point, then this project is a good opportunity to practice. You can introduce the story and provide context to the significance of the story. You can transition with your voice and appearance between story segments. And you can conclude the story and provide a summary or “what happens next” statement.

Shoot a variety of camera shots. Whether you plan to be a visual journalist or not, you need to understand and learn how to execute the types of shots. See this website for visual examples and descriptions as we go over the definitions below.

  • Extreme wide shots. Shows the whole entire scene of an event, location, or story. These shots give viewers information about where the story takes place. They set the scene and give context early on in a story.
  • Very wide shots. Shows less background and shows the subject in the large scene. The subject is barely visible.
  • Wide shots. Shows the whole subject so the visual emphasis is on the subject rather than the background.
  • Mid shots. Shows the subject even closer, but a bit of the scene is still visible in the frame.
  • Medium close-up shots. Shows the subject even closer and the subject’s features and expressions are more of the focus.
  • Close-up shots. Shows the subject’s head to shoulder area.
  • Extreme close-up shots. Shows only the subject in the frame, such as the subject’s eyes and nose.
  • Cut-in shots. Shows some other part of the main subject, not the face and shoulders.
  • Cutaway shots. B-roll that is used as transitions between shots or to add information not offered by shots of the main subject or scene.
  • Point-of-view shots. Shows a scene from the subject’s perspective such that you feel like you are in their shoes.

Optional: Camera movement techniques. Camera movements are more advanced production techniques. They may not work out well if you do not have a high-quality video camera. Thus, I would avoid these techniques unless you have prior experience with video or unless you have a high-quality video camera. If you decide to use camera movements, see the techniques below:

  • Zooming: Going from wide-angle to close-up or vice versa.
  • Panning: Moving the camera horizontally.
  • Tilts: Moving the camera vertically.
  • Tracking: Moving the camera around accordingly to track the subject.

Composition concerns: Give headroom so the interviewee has space above their head during the shot. Avoid distractions in the background of shots. Remember the rule of thirds still!

Be Flexible: No matter home much planning you do in pre-production, from deciding who you want to interview to what types of b-roll shots you want, something is bound to not go your way, or the event you’re at will be different than you envisioned. Be willing to change you plan during production based on what is happening at the event in real time.

3. Post-Production (The Editing Process)

Editing programs. You have access to Adobe Premiere Elements in this lab, CR 207, as well as Ross Hall 423 (next to my office), AS 228, and the IT building computer lab. However, you are free to use another editing program, such as iMovie, FinalCutPro, or Windows Movie Maker. Adobe Premiere and FinalCutPro are the industry standards for video editing. iMovie is pretty good for being a standard software on a MacBook. Windows Movie Maker is pretty awful and I don’t recommend it unless you have no other options. Also, consider downloading  a trial version of Adobe Premiere. The IT building has a beautiful Mac computer in the scantron room that has FinalCutPro on it.

Conceptual Editing. You want to brainstorm and plan out your story before you begin with technical editing. You want to have the story flow ironed out first. If you’re stuck, think about how you’d tell a friend your story. What did you start with? What else did you tell your friend? How does the story end? Also, search for sound bites that address the who, what, where, when, why, how, and so what.

The video editing process is similar to the audio editing process. Remember the tips associated with audio editing.

Keep your story focused — it’s supposed to be about 2-4 minutes.

Project Requirements

Below are the main points you need to consider while working on your project. I will use these elements to evaluate your work.

  • At least 2 sources
  • At least 5 seconds of ambient noise, natural sound, or music
  • Video is between 2 and 4 minutes
  • Video shots are diverse (see camera shots and camera movements above)
  • Speakers are introduced with titles and/or the speaker self-identifies themselves and/or the reporter identifies the speaker
  • Story has a beginning, middle, and end (narrative arc)
  • Editing is smooth

Video Storytelling for Public Relations, Promotions, and Marketing

Video can be used for a variety of different reasons including journalism, PR, marketing, and advertising, and the way that you edit and shoot a video is a little bit different for each one. In each case you want to be able to tell a complete story.

Journalism: Tell the whole story from all sides. Find opposing arguments for interviews so that viewers can get facts from both sides or multiple sources with different things to say. Add b-roll that is relevant to the story even if it is not the most artsy shot it might be the most informative.

Public Relations: In this case you will probably only be telling the story from one side, the side that the company, department, etc. is on, and you video will likely be positive, factual information about the company, etc. the b-roll shots in this type of video should highlight those positive things that the interviewee is talking about. Example

Promotions: These videos are a lot like advertisements. To make an exciting promotional video, you want eye catching shots, that include whatever it is that you’re promoting. A lot of the time these are artistic shots, or fast pace shots that keep the viewer engaged, and interested. Example

Video Storytelling Examples From Past Classes

Example of Promotional Story on a Local Company – Louisa Wilkinson and Taylor Dilts

Example of Journalistic Story on a Non-Event – Hannah Robinson and Esther Seville

Example of a Promotional Story on a Local Band – Kaisha McCutchen and Bianca Coca

Example of Journalistic Approach with No Reporter Narration – Edward Timmons and Miranda Anderson

Example of Journalistic Approach  With Reporter Narrative – Jordan Blazovich and Nick Robinson

Example of Journalistic Approach to an Event Story without Reporter Narration – Kaitlyn Camargo and Lauren Garrelts

Example of Journalistic Approach to a Non-event Story without Reporter Narration – Brittany Hamilton and Scottie Melton

Example of Promotional Approach – Courtney Gifford, Travis Hoff, Sam Weinstein
Border War: The ROTC Story

Video Interns Needed

POTENTIAL VIDEO INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITY:
I am in search of potential student interns to work in a variety of positions for a student
media creative agency here at UWYO.
I’m looking for interns related to but not limited to individuals from departments of:
– Communication (photo/videographers, social media, journalists, pr)
– Business (accounting, Account management, sales)
– Art (graphic design, interior design)
– Theater (actors for films, commercials, makeup, voice, etc)
– Music (composers, singers, songwriters)
– English (editors, writers)
– Language (anyone that speaks another language, I do international video work).
My most recent film was the commercial you see at FOX THEATER

A variety of other work found on my posting found here:

If interested, please email me at andrewluisbaker@gmail.com
If possible, please include in your email:
– Anticipated graduation date
– School Major
– Resume- Availability to meet for interview
– Skill set and desired position
– Other ideas?
– Questions?
– Anything else I should know?
Thank you,
Andrew Baker

Summer Multimedia Internship at Pew Research Center

Organization Overview

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research in the areas of U.S. politics and policy views; media and journalism; internet and technology; religion and public life; Hispanic trends; global attitudes and U.S. social and demographic trends. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center’s work is carried out by a staff of 130.

Position Summary

The summer internship is a paid internship opportunity during the summer of 2015 (beginning in May or June 2015) for undergraduate students in their junior or senior year, recent college graduates, or graduate level students with an interest in digital video journalism. The Multimedia Intern will work to create visually compelling digital content to disseminate Pew Research Center’s findings and analysis to its key target audiences. Working under the supervision of the Art Director, they will help to conceptualize and create compelling ways to disseminate Center research through video, motion graphics, data visualization and animation.

Primary Responsibilities

  • Create fast-turnaround, high-quality video and motion-graphics products that adhere to Center design and data standards, for distribution via multiple channels including the Pew Research web site, social media, partner web sites, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.
  • Act as primary production resource for all phases of video production, including shooting, audio engineering, lighting and editing at Pew Research and remote locations
  • Provide guidance to other staff on fundamentals of video production
  • Work with other members of digital and communications teams to measure the success of multimedia offerings via analysis of web and social media analytics

Education/Training /Experience

  • Experience with all phases of creating high quality video, motion graphics or other multimedia products in a news or academic environment

Knowledge and Skill Requirements

  • Excellent editorial judgment and proven ability to create high quality digital video products
  • Interest in data journalism and presentation, and exacting standards to maintain accuracy in all work products
  • Knowledge of digital video cameras, audio and lighting principles
  • Experience with digital editing and motion-graphics software (FinalCut, AfterEffects, Motion, etc.) and knowledge of digital video compression and rendering standards
  • Knowledge of social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, etc.) and interest in using social media for content distribution and marketing
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Procedure

Applicant should send a résumé, cover letter (indicating where you learned of the opening) and portfolio/demo-reel links to careers@pewresearch.org. Responses can also be mailed to:

Human Resources Department
Pew Research Center
1615 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC  20036

We are an equal opportunity employer.

Videographer Needed

Ariana Hahl, is currently a Vocal Performance major and will be holding her junior recital next month. I am looking for someone willing to videotape the entire recital and produce a solid DVD for me that she could use in promotional materials down the road. I am not expecting a professional-quality DVD, but do expect editing and a touched-up final product to be proud of. The particulars:

  • Recital is Saturday, April 18, 3:00 at the Buchanan Center for Performing Arts at UW – would need to be there early enough to set up
  • Mandatory attendance to 1-2 dress rehearsals to ensure placement of equipment, sound, etc. is performance-ready – date and time TBD
  • Fee negotiable, depending on experience

If anyone is interested, please have them email me at mysmile92@yahoo.com (cc’d above) or call me at 832.803.8562. I certainly do appreciate your willingness to help get the word out. I am attaching a flier — – please join us at her recital!  Thanks

April R. Hahl, MHRM, SPHR | Senior HR Business Partner
Baker Hughes | Pressure Pumping
Office: 832.559.4450 | Fax: 307.224.4187
Cell: 713.540.0210 | april.hahl@bakerhughes.com
http://www.bakerhughes.com | Advancing Reservoir Performance

Student Work: Video Storytelling

Alison Clarke and Katelind Higgins

Andrew O’Neill and Ben Banta

Bianca Coca and Kaisha McCutchan

Brooklynn Gray and Max Renton

Charlie McClain and K.C. Schooner

Edward Timmons and Miranda Anderson

Esther Seville and Hannah Robinson

Jordan Blazovich and Nick Robinson

Kaitlyn Camargo and Lauren Garrelts

Louisa Wilkinson and Taylor Dilts

More Video Storytelling Examples

First, 10 minutes to evaluate the class and my teaching.

Now, a few reminders:

1. For the Twitter assignment, follow me on Twitter. I can’t grade your work otherwise.

2. Review the Twitter assignment guidelines BEFORE you tweet. You need at least 10 tweets, two interviews, and hashtags on tweets. You also need to be professional and use newswriting style. And the tweets should show a narrative arc (beginning, middle, and end to the event or story).

3. The tweets are due by next Thurs. 12/11 @ 11:59 p.m.

4. The video project can be promotional or journalistic. It’s between 2 and 4 minutes. You can use whatever editing program you like. There should be two on-camera interviews. There should be a narrative arc as well. Don’t forget the ambient noise.

5. The video project is due by Thurs. 12/18 @ 12:15 p.m.

6. WRITE BLOG POSTS and answer the assignment questions for BOTH the Twitter and video assignments. Please don’t forget this. The highest grade you can get is a C if you forget this (see grading rubrics).

7. There is still time to take the extra credit online survey. The deadline is Thurs. 12/11. Visit: http://kwiksurveys.com/s.asp?sid=2cuc0x5gox88nj0290568

8. Please connect with me on LinkedIn. I enjoy keeping tabs on what my former students are doing in the working world. I may even invite you to be a guest speaker in one of my classes.

 

Below are some additional video storytelling examples. Let’s take a look and discuss as a class.

What was done well? What could be improved?

 

What are you doing for your video storytelling project?

Video Storytelling Project

Video Storytelling

The ability to tell a good story with video is a difficult yet important skill for journalists and communicators to learn. Video is not just on TV anymore — you can find video stories online and on mobile devices as well. You’ll work in teams of two for this project. Let’s partner up and review the project instructions.

1. Pre-Production (Before You Shoot)

Choose a story (or event!) that is well suited for video. This includes stories that have strong visual components and that have any sort of motion.

Identify your sources. Seek out multiple and diverse perspectives for your story.

Write preliminary interview questions after researching the story. Plan out your questions, story focus, and narrative (i.e., beginning, middle, and end) in advance, as much as you can. However, also remember to be adaptable during the interview and ask appropriate follow-up questions.

“Show me, don’t tell me” is the mantra in video storytelling. Find a way to show a story unfolding with video. Minimize the on-camera interviews with people (i.e., “talking head interviews”). It’s more interesting to watch an event occur rather than here about it from an interviewee.

Plan to shoot a variety of angles and types of shots. For suggestions, see Production, below.

Consider how you (the reporter) will fit into the story. Will you appear on-camera to set the scene or conduct an interview? If you’d like to try that, go ahead! Or, will you be completely invisible to the audience, just like you were during the Soundslides project and the audio profile project? Or, will you narrate the story without appearing on-camera?

2. Production (When You’re On-Location)

Plan on shooting before and after the event (if shooting an event). This ensures you have a variety of material to create your edited story from. Also, it helps develop a narrative of before, during, and after the event.

Shoot B-roll. B-roll is supplemental footage that relates to your story. For example, a video story about the the UW track team’s meet should include video of athletes warming up, tying their shoelaces, talking with coaches, etc. These are the shots that you can use to fill time while an interviewee is talking or while ambient noise (e.g., background noise from the event or music) is playing. For a 2-minute story, shoot at least 30 seconds of B-roll footage.

Shoot on-camera interviews with your sources. When shooting interviews, remember to look around at your surroundings. Is it relevant to the story? Can you move somewhere else to get the interview that is not as chaotic or loud? Just as with the audio interviews, encourage your sources to relax, act natural, and provide context to the answer they are giving to your question. Don’t be afraid to re-shoot a question and ask a question again. Oftentimes, the source gives a better and more eloquent answer to your question the second time you ask it.

Optional: Shoot on-camera reporters. If you’d like to appear on-camera as a broadcaster at some point, then this project is a good opportunity to practice. You can introduce the story and provide context to the significance of the story. You can transition with your voice and appearance between story segments. And you can conclude the story and provide a summary or “what happens next” statement.

Shoot a variety of camera shots. Whether you plan to be a visual journalist or not, you need to understand and learn how to execute the types of shots. See this website for visual examples and descriptions as we go over the definitions below.

  • Extreme wide shots. Shows the whole entire scene of an event, location, or story. These shots give viewers information about where the story takes place. They set the scene and give context early on in a story.
  • Very wide shots. Shows less background and shows the subject in the large scene. The subject is barely visible.
  • Wide shots. Shows the whole subject so the visual emphasis is on the subject rather than the background.
  • Mid shots. Shows the subject even closer, but a bit of the scene is still visible in the frame.
  • Medium close-up shots. Shows the subject even closer and the subject’s features and expressions are more of the focus.
  • Close-up shots. Shows the subject’s head to shoulder area.
  • Extreme close-up shots. Shows only the subject in the frame, such as the subject’s eyes and nose.
  • Cut-in shots. Shows some other part of the main subject, not the face and shoulders.
  • Cutaway shots. B-roll that is used as transitions between shots or to add information not offered by shots of the main subject or scene.
  • Point-of-view shots. Shows a scene from the subject’s perspective such that you feel like you are in their shoes.

 

Optional: Camera movement techniques. Camera movements are more advanced production techniques. They may not work out well if you do not have a high-quality video camera. Thus, I would avoid these techniques unless you have prior experinece with video or unless you have a high-quality video camear. If you decide to use camea movements, see the techniques below:

  • Zooming: Going from wide-angle to close-up or vice versa.
  • Panning: Moving the camera horizontally.
  • Tilts: Moving the camera vertically.
  • Tracking: Moving the camera around accordingly to track the subject.

 

Composition concerns: Give headroom so the interviewee has space above their head during the shot. Avoid distractions in the background of shots. Remember the rule of thirds still!

3. Post-Production (The Editing Process)

Editing programs. You have access to Adobe Premiere Elements in this lab, CR 207, as well as Ross Hall 423 (next to my office) and the IT building computer lab. However, you are free to use another editing program, such as iMovie, FinalCutPro, or Windows Movie Maker. Adobe Premiere and FinalCutPro are the industry standards for video editing. iMovie is pretty good for being a standard software on a MacBook. Windows Movie Maker is pretty awful and I don’t recommend it unless you have no other options. Also, consider downloading  a trial version of Adobe Premiere.

Conceptual Editing. You want to brainstorm and plan out your story before you begin with technical editing. You want to have the story flow ironed out first. If you’re stuck, think about how you’d tell a friend your story. What did you start with? What else did you tell your friend? How does the story end? Also, search for sound bites that address the who, what, where, when, why, how, and so what.

The video editing process is similar to the audio editing process. Remember the tips associated with audio editing.

Keep your story focused — it’s supposed to be about 2-4 minutes.

Project Requirements

Below are the main points you need to consider while working on your project. I will use these elements to evaluate your work.

  • At least 2 sources
  • At least 5 seconds of ambient noise, natural sound, or music
  • Video is between 2 and 4 minutes
  • Video shots are diverse (see camera shots and camera movements above)
  • Speakers are introduced with titles and/or the speaker self-identifies themselves and/or the reporter identifies the speaker
  • Story has a beginning, middle, and end
  • Editing is smooth

 

Video Storytelling Examples From Past Classes

Example of Journalistic Approach to a Non-Event Story with Reporter Narration – Zachary Laux and Cameron Patey
Online Gaming

Example of Journalistic Approach to a Non-Event Story Without Reporter Narration – Nic Behnke and Shane Staley
Snowy Range – New Terrain Park

Example of Journalistic Approach to an Event Story without Reporter Narration – Tiffany Le Gal and Anna Rader
MLK Jr. Days of Dialogue/March @ University of Wyoming

Example of Promotional Approach – Courtney Gifford, Travis Hoff, Sam Weinstein
Border War: The ROTC Story

Dow Jones & The Wall Street Journal Paid Internships

Many internships are unpaid. However, I want to direct your attention to some prestigious and paid internships offered by Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal. The internships are in reporting, video, graphics, social media, and photography.

Additionally, there are Dow Jones News Fund paid internships as well. They are in business reporting, news, digital, and sports editing.

The deadlines are Nov. 1.

For the Dow Jones News Fund internships, there is an editing exam that potential news, digital, and sports editing interns must take. The business reporting exam is different from the editing exam.

Let’s take a past exam in order to understand the issues that interns and real-world reporters and editors face every day. It’s tough. So you’re free to use the Internet while taking the exam. I still think it will be a worthwhile experience for you!

You can view other past exams from EditTeach.org.

 

HSI, Day 12: Self-Reflection about HSI & Videography Basics

Class Discussion & Blog Post

Your HSI experience is almost to an end. How do you feel about that? What stories will you tell about HSI? Let’s take some time to answer these self-reflection questions. Be honest and thoughtful when you answer these questions. In the distant future, you will want to remember what kind of person you were at HSI. Pick a few of these questions to answer:

  1. What did you learn from your classes at HSI? What specific lessons do you want to remember for the future? What big-picture themes or thoughts do you want to remember for the future?
  2. What is your favorite memory from HSI? Describe the memory in detail. Why did that memory make such an impression on you?
  3. What was the funniest thing that happened at HSI? Describe the memory in detail. Why was it funny?
  4. How do you think you’ve grown as a person from coming to HSI? Have you become more outgoing and friendly? Have you conquered any fears? Have you learned to be more independent?
  5. How do you think HSI prepared you for college life and your future career path?
  6. If you could re-live HSI, what would you do differently?
  7. What will you tell your friends and family back home about HSI? You know that question is just waiting for you back home…

I’m curious about what everyone took away from HSI. Let’s hear it!

Videography Basics

1. Pre-Production (Before You Shoot)

Choose a story (or event!) that is well suited for video. This includes stories that have strong visual components and that have any sort of motion.

Identify your sources. Seek out multiple and diverse perspectives for your story.

Write preliminary interview questions after researching the story. Plan out your questions, story focus, and narrative (i.e., beginning, middle, and end) in advance, as much as you can. However, also remember to be adaptable during the interview and ask appropriate follow-up questions.

“Show me, don’t tell me” is the mantra in video storytelling. Find a way to show a story unfolding with video. Minimize the on-camera interviews with people (i.e., “talking head interviews”). It’s more interesting to watch an event occur rather than hear about it from an interviewee.

Plan to shoot a variety of angles and types of shots. For suggestions, see Production, below.

Consider how you (the reporter) will fit into the story. Will you appear on-camera to set the scene or conduct an interview? Or, will you be completely invisible to the audience? Or, will you narrate the story without appearing on-camera?

2. Production (When You’re On-Location)

Plan on shooting before and after the event (if shooting an event). This ensures you have a variety of material to create your edited story from. Also, it helps develop a narrative of before, during, and after the event.

Shoot B-roll. B-roll is supplemental footage that relates to your story. For example, a video story about the the UW track team’s meet should include video of athletes warming up, tying their shoelaces, talking with coaches, etc. These are the shots that you can use to fill time while an interviewee is talking or while ambient noise (e.g., background noise from the event or music) is playing. For a 2-minute story, shoot at least 30 seconds of B-roll footage.

Shoot on-camera interviews with your sources. When shooting interviews, remember to look around at your surroundings. Is it relevant to the story? Can you move somewhere else to get the interview that is not as chaotic or loud? Just as with audio interviews, encourage your sources to relax, act natural, and provide context to the answer they are giving to your question. Don’t be afraid to re-shoot a question and ask a question again. Oftentimes, the source gives a better and more eloquent answer to your question the second time you ask it. Finally, shoot with the rule-of-thirds in mind and don’t “center” your subject. Shoot the subject from an angle.

Shoot on-camera reporters. If you’d like to appear on-camera as a broadcaster at some point, then this project is a good opportunity to practice. You can introduce the story and provide context to the significance of the story. You can transition with your voice and appearance between story segments. And you can conclude the story and provide a summary or “what happens next” statement.

Get a variety of camera shots. Whether you plan to be a visual journalist or not, you need to understand and learn how to execute the types of shots. See this website for visual examples and descriptions as we go over the definitions below.

  • Extreme wide shots. Shows the whole entire scene of an event, location, or story. These shots give viewers information about where the story takes place. They set the scene and give context early on in a story.
  • Very wide shots. Shows less background and shows the subject in the large scene. The subject is barely visible.
  • Wide shots. Shows the whole subject so the visual emphasis is on the subject rather than the background.
  • Mid shots. Shows the subject even closer, but a bit of the scene is still visible in the frame.
  • Medium close-up shots. Shows the subject even closer and the subject’s features and expressions are more of the focus.
  • Close-up shots. Shows the subject’s head to shoulder area.
  • Extreme close-up shots. Shows only the subject in the frame, such as the subject’s eyes and nose.
  • Cut-in shots. Shows some other part of the main subject, not the face and shoulders.
  • Cutaway shots. B-roll that is used as transitions between shots or to add information not offered by shots of the main subject or scene.
  • Point-of-view shots. Shows a scene from the subject’s perspective such that you feel like you are in their shoes.

Camera movement techniques. Camera movements are more advanced production techniques. They may not work out well if you do not have a high-quality video camera. Thus, I would avoid these techniques unless you have prior experience with video or unless you have a high-quality video camera. If you decide to use camera movements, see the techniques below:

  • Zooming: Going from wide-angle to close-up or vice versa.
  • Panning: Moving the camera horizontally.
  • Tilts: Moving the camera vertically.
  • Tracking: Moving the camera around accordingly to track the subject.

Composition concerns: Give headroom so the interviewee has space above their head during the shot. Avoid distractions in the background of shots. Remember the rule of thirds still!

3. Post-Production (The Editing Process)

Editing programs. Adobe Premiere and FinalCutPro are the industry standards for video editing. iMovie is pretty good for being a standard software on a MacBook. Windows Movie Maker is pretty awful and I don’t recommend it unless you have no other options.

Conceptual Editing. You want to brainstorm and plan out your story before you begin with technical editing. You want to have the story flow ironed out first. If you’re stuck, think about how you’d tell a friend your story. What did you start with? What else did you tell your friend? How does the story end? Also, search for sound bites that address the who, what, where, when, why, how, and so what.

Other tips

  • Keep your story focused — it’s supposed to be about 2-3 minutes.
  • Seek the best short clips. The best video stories are comprised of many short clips edited together.
  • Mix it up with multiple types of camera shots (e.g., close-ups, wide shots, cut-ins, etc.).
  • It’s OK that your video clips do not “fade” and “dissolve” into one another. Usually news clips do not fade or dissolve. If you are telling a more promotional video story, then you may want to check out how to do fades and dissolves.
  • Just like any other program, you can add, delete, and move pieces of video around.

Video Storytelling Examples From Past Classes

Example of Journalistic Approach to a Non-Event Story with Reporter Narration – Zachary Laux and Cameron Patey
Online Gaming

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COJO 3530, Week 15: Editing Your Video Story

Getting Started Editing

Adobe Premiere Elements has been installed our classroom, CR 207, as well as the IT building. But that’s it. Keep in mind that the IT building is open 24 hours.

I am giving you the rest of the class to work on your video projects. Attendance is still required, unless you’ve already completed your video project, uploaded your video to YouTube, and written the relevant blog post. Remember, both the social media project and the video project are due by Fri. 5/3 @ 11:59 p.m. However, for the video project only, you can have until Wed. 5/8 @ 11:59 p.m. without a late penalty.

Tips
Let’s watch a video about editing in Adobe Premiere Elements. As we watch this basic tutorial video, I will follow along. I encourage you to open Adobe Premiere Elements and follow along as well.

In regard to questions about whatever video editing program you use or whatever information you need about video editing, please try to use an Internet search for your topic and try to find a video tutorial to help you. For example, I found a series of tutorials about Adobe Premiere Elements on YouTube. Specifically, I found how to add titles to video by searching for “adobe premiere elements 9 adding titles”.

My knowledge is limited to Premiere and Premiere Elements. Having said that, if you are struggling and have a question, don’t hesitate to ask me after trying to solve the problem yourself.

Video Editing.

  • Seek the best short clips. The best video stories are comprised of many short clips edited together.
  • Mix it up with multiple types of camera shots (e.g., close-ups, wide shots, cut-ins, etc.).
  • It’s OK that your video clips do not “fade” and “dissolve” into one another. Usually news clips do not fade or dissolve. If you are telling a more promotional video story, then you may want to check out how to do fades and dissolves.
  • Just like any other program, you can add, delete, and move pieces of video around.

New Material to Cover in Wednesday’s Class:

  • You can also add titles, add audio tracks, add photos, and (of course) more videos.
  • And, you can layer these clips on top of each other.
  • Finally, we need to export our project and upload it to YouTube. Let’s cover that as well.

Adobe Premiere Elements 9: Video Tutorials.

  1. Basic Tutorial: Checking video properties, deleting and moving tracks (including ripple delete vs. clear)
  2. Another Basic Tutorial: Creating a new project, importing media files (e.g., photos, videos, audio), working in the timeline, adding titles to your video screen, exporting your video
  3. Sceneline vs. Timeline Workspace: Explains why the timeline is a better workspace than the sceneline. Includes information on how to layer and why you would layer multiple photos/videos.
  4. Adding Audio and Changing Volume: This shows you how to add a separate audio track and change the volume of that track only.
  5. Using the Smart Mix option under the Audio Tools: This helpful tool detects if voice is present and increases the volume of the voice over background noise. Try it out if your speaker is hard to hear.
  6. Transitional effects between clips, visual effects, titles: Gives a brief overview of these effects.
  7. Browse all tutorials here
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