Media Literacy, Blogging, & Photography

UW High School Institute

Tag: social media (page 1 of 3)

HSI, Class 2: Photography Basics

Multimedia

Blogging Workshop

dslr-camera

While it is great to use a DSLR camera because they produce high-quality photos, you can still capture great photos using your smartphone or point-and-shoot camera.

— Finish Blogging Workshop, if needed —

Document Your HSI Experience with Photography

We will go on three field trips during this class: Vedauwoo, the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, and the Snowy Range Mountains. At each field trip, I want you to take as many photos as you can that use the creative devices and strategies that we learn today.

During class, we will share your HSI photography and memories on your blog.

You are not allowed to use your phones during HSI unless you are in my class. And, you are only allowed to use your phones for class-related activities. No Snapchating your friends back home!

First things first, we’ll learn about the basics of photography and forever-useful creative devices.

Creative Devices for Composition

Good photojournalism begins with understanding basic composition and design principles. Here’s some easy ways to improve your shots.

Steady Does It: Hold the camera steady by digging your elbows into your chest, placing your elbows on something, using two hands, or leaning against a wall.

photographer_laying

Move around to get different angles and perspectives.

Move Around and Get Closer: You need to constantly be moving around to get a variety of good shots. Go on your stomach, your knees, a ladder, or chair. Change your position and your angle. Don’t be afraid to get very close to your subjects.

Use Vertical Shots: Don’t always shoot horizontals, be sure you use vertical shots as well.

Pick A Focal Point: The automatic focus on point-and-shoot does a good job at focusing on what you desire, but it is sometimes limiting to work with. So, when you want to focus on something very close and want to blur the background, you can use the “macro” function on your camera (if it has one).

Light: Natural light provided by the sun is the best light to shoot in. If there is bright sunlight and you’re shooting people who are facing the sun, they may squint and shadows may be cast on their faces. Be sure to avoid those shadows by moving around to find the best angle. If there is bright sunlight and people have the sun behind them, their faces will be dark. You can compensate by using a flash. Noon and mid-day sunlight is typically bad sunlight for photography. Sunrise and sunset light is better. But, partly sunny days provide the best light because it is much softer on skin.

shooting_into_the_sun

Shooting into the sun will create shadows on your subjects. This creates interesting contrast of color and texture. Alternatively, you could use a flash in order to provide some lighting on your subjects.

Now for the Top Composition Tips as outlined by Photography Mad, as well as a few more suggestions of my own.

  1. Rule of Thirds: Example
  2. Balancing Elements: Example
  3. Leading Lines: Example
  4. Symmetry and Patterns: Example
  5. Viewpoint: Example
  6. Background: Example
  7. Create Depth: Example
  8. Framing: Example
  9. Cropping (Note: This does not refer to cropping in Photoshop; this refers to compositional cropping when you take the photo): Example
  10. Color: Example
  11. Texture: Example
  12. Establishing Size: Example
  13. Contrast: Example
  14. Focus: Example

Let’s take a look at some photos on The New York Times Lens photography blog and talk about what kind of devices their photos use.

A note about your rights and duties as a photographer.

  1. In public, you can photograph anyone or anything. If they approach you and request you don’t take their picture, you may respect their request; but, keep in mind that they are in public and they cannot expect any privacy in public (i.e., you can keep taking their picture).
  2. In private residences, businesses, and property, you should get permission. They may not allow photography. **You can always ask for forgiveness rather than permission, though.**
  3. If people ask why you’re taking photos, explain it is for your class blog and schoolwork.

Now that you know how to take better photos, you can avoid cutting people’s heads off and having poles or trees stick out of people’s heads!

It takes 100 photos to get about 5 great photos. The point: TAKE A LOT OF PHOTOS!

Activity: Photo Practice

Let’s practice our photography skills around campus. Here’s a list of things to photograph this morning. Be sure you can tell me what creative device you used!

Our goal: Take 50 photos in 15 minutes. Work fast!

  1. The inside or outside of the Geological Museum
  2. The enormity of Prexy’s Pasture
  3. An extreme close-up photo of something in Prexy’s Pasture
  4. A flower, tree, or animal
  5. Your HSI friend and/or instructor
  6. Climb on top of an object (preferably, a steady object) and take a photo from up above
  7. Something that has made you happy at HSI
  8. A physical object that can be interpreted as the first letter of your first name
  9. Get on your belly on the ground somewhere and take a photo

Activity: Photo Reflection Blog Post

Let’s discuss your photos. What did you take photos of? What did you learn about photography?

Now, in your blog post, post your five best photos. For each photo, please explain what creative devices are used in the photo.

Write a paragraph about you learned about photography.


 

Media Literacy

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Your Online Identity

Activity: Interactive on How Teens Share Information on Social Media

Teen Voices: Dating in a Digital World – This is a brief review of survey data and comments from teens about dating nowadays.

Our first discussion topic today revolves around your online identity. Check out this visual data about what teens are doing online.

More information about social media and teens in 2015.

Important note: There are no right or wrong answers to the blog post questions and discussion. In fact, more diversity in the class’s opinions is actually helpful. We get to learn more when people share their unique and genuine opinions.

Let’s write a blog post about these questions and discuss them as a class. Please answer:

  • How does your own online behavior compare to the data that we just examined?
  • How many limits do your parents put on your online identity and internet time?
  • How do you think your online identity should look for college? For when you want to get a job?
  • What privacy concerns exist for you and potential college admissions officers and employers?
  • Is it right for a college or employer to reject/fire you based on your online identity?

— My Thoughts —

Be proud of whatever you write on your blog and whatever you share online. You do not want to regret something in the future. Remember, if it’s posted online, it’s there F O R E V E R!

HSI, Class 1: Welcome, Class Goals, Media Literacy, & Blog Setup

Let Me Introduce Myself…

I’m Dr. Kristen D. Landreville, PhD (2010, The Ohio State University). I’m an associate professor and the director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of Wyoming.

But, you can call me “Kristen.”

I’ve lived in the Northeast, South, Midwest, and now the West. And, I love Wyoming. I’ve lived here with my family for 7 years. My husband is getting his PhD in chemical engineering. I have three daughters (ages 9, 4, and 3) who you will meet tomorrow at my house for dinner. They always LOVE the high school students each year and they are very excited to meet you.

At UW, I regularly teach courses in multimedia production, web design, political communication, and quantitative research methods. I’ve also taught media writing, magazine and feature writing, introduction to mass media, and media literacy. I’m teaching a new science journalism course next year, too.

I research topics like political campaigns, political narratives and media (e.g., political humor/satire, political documentaries/movies, political news), and the intersection of politics, science, and narratives.

Your class is my 5th HSI class. I keep coming back to teach at HSI because I love meeting, teaching, learning from, and interacting with exceptional high school students in Wyoming. I’m proud to say that several of my former HSI students are now my COLLEGE students at UW! So, I am very excited for these next few weeks together.

Who Are You?

Name

Hometown

What is your favorite media activity and why? For example, listening to music, reading books, watching movies, checking and updating social media, taking photos, blogging, making videos, etc.

Goals for the Class:

  1. Becoming “Media Literate”
  2. Understanding Blogging and WordPress
  3. Expressing Your Thoughts About Media in a Professional, Critical, and Personal Style
  4. Becoming More Open-Minded About Diverse/Different Points of View
  5. Participating in a Community of Students Who Support and Encourage, Yet Also Challenge, One Another
  6. Using Creative Devices to Improve Your Photography
  7. HAVE FUN!

Side note: While you are allowed to challenge each other and question each other, you are NOT ALLOWED to be rude, mean, condescending, superior, and just plain ugly to other people based on their opinions, views, orientations, gender, race, age, capabilities, etc.

Discussion of Media Literacy

Define media literacy. How does it impact you?

Part of understanding how media impacts your life is dependent on how “media literate” you are. Let’s formally define what skills it takes to become “media literate”. (Note: Adapted from Stanley J. Baran’s “Introduction to Mass Communication”, 8th edition).

The ability and willingness to make an effort to understand content, pay attention, and to filter out noise — The quality of our meaning making is related to the effort we give it.

An understanding of and respect for the power of media messages — Break down the third-person effect

The ability to distinguish emotional from reasoned reactions when responding to content and to act accordingly — Ask yourself, “Why does this content make me feel this way?”

Development of heightened expectations of media content — Expect more from your media content

A knowledge of genre conventions and the ability to recognize when they are being mixed — Realize that news, entertainment, and marketing are all mixed now

The ability to think critically about media messages, no matter how credible their sources — Analyze your news source from a balanced and objective point-of-view

A knowledge of the internal language of various media and the ability to understand its effects, no matter how complex — Understand how production values (e.g., lighting, editing, special effects, music, camera angle, location on the page, and size and placement of headline) impact the audience

We will cover most of these 7 skills in our class. My goal is for you to view media–ads, movies, news, TV, Facebook, etc.–in a whole new way after this class. Be empowered by media literacy!

Blogging Your HSI Story and Media Literacy Experience: WordPress Blog Setup

For your blog, you’ll be posting your classwork here, but I strongly encourage you to also post other thoughts to your blog, like posting some of your HSI feelings and experiences.

So think of your blog as like a continually updated “live” storytelling portfolio. Google yourself right now. What website pops up first? If you post to your blog frequently, then your blog may pop up first (which is what you want). And in the future, you want employers to find your blog when they Google you. So keep updating it!

And you may want to connect your blog to your greater online presence. Post the blog link to your profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and any other online presence you have.

Once you have your blog set up, you need to post! Good blogs do the following:

  • Update frequently
  • Write in the first-person (i.e., “I think) and use conversation-style that shows your personality
  • Provide specific headlines
  • Provide links elsewhere to helpful information
  • Allow readers to comment and comment back to readers
  • Are ongoing conversations among members of a community
  • Can be your professional portfolio, journal, or brainstorming session
  • Embed photos, video, audio, and other multimedia features
  • Are relatively short, usually less than 800 words

Now that you know more about blogging, let’s go to WordPress.com and get your blog setup.

Example HSI Student Blogs

Let’s look at a few examples of HSI student blogs from last year. In particular, please read their “last day” posts. These students have some helpful hints and messages for you today!

Blogging Workshop

  • Create an “about” page
    • Your name. You do not have to use your real name anywhere on the blog if you want to preserve your privacy. But, you must tell me what your blog name is so I can link to it from our class blog.
    • Some demographic information, such as where you are from and what your family is like.
    • What the purpose of this blog is (e.g., it’s to showcase your storytelling work and/or express your memories and experiences from HSI).
    • Some interests and what you like to do in your spare time.
    • Your career goals.
  • Linking to other web pages
  • Posting photos and inserting other media or files

 Write Your First Blog Post

  • Create a new post
  • Using categories
  • Using tags
  • Saving drafts
  • Changing the visibility
  • Publishing the post

Let’s address these initial topics. Remember the blogging tips. Remember to look for relevant photos and links on the web to include on your post. Let’s write.

  1. Your HSI Experience So Far
    • Explain how you were nominated for HSI. Why did you want to participate in HSI?
    • What do you expect or hope to learn from your HSI classes? From your fellow HSI classmates? What do you expect or hope to learn about yourself?
    • How has your HSI experience been so far? Is it what you expected?
    • Is there anything about HSI that you are NOT looking forward to?
  2. Reading Past HSI Students’ Blogs
    • What information did you find insightful or helpful on past HSI students’ blogs?
    • Was there anything on the past students’ blogs that surprised you?

Social Media Management for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

How Social Media is Used by the Big Three Media Fields

Social media is for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, or public relations manager, all of these fields rely on social media now.

You can use social media:

  • To help you create a presence and voice
  • To promote your stories or your products
  • To search for story ideas and sources
  • To network with others in your field
  • To engage with your audience, start a conversation

No doubt, social media is changing our media world. Let’s review some resources.

Please choose to review either the journalists, PR, or advertising sections below. Review each link in your chosen section. Write down 3 things that you’d like to share with the class about what you learned from reading these articles in your section.

There are also some helpful hints that could apply to journalism, public relations, and advertising. Keep up to date on these hints for social media at Social Media Examiner. Here are some of the most helpful posts and lessons that I’ve discovered on this website:

Critical Analysis and Comparison of Two Organizations’ Social Media Management

Blog Post #8 Due on Fri. Nov. 4 by 11:59 p.m. | Presentations of Results on Monday and Wednesday

For Blog Post 8, you will write a critical analysis and comparison of two organizations’ social media management styles. Download Blog Post 8 for details. Here’s the short version of the assignment:

  • As you sit down to do your analysis, be sure to review these links above that we’ve reviewed.
  • Use the specific advice offered in these articles as you conduct your analysis.
  • Examine the 6 major social media platforms noted in the assignment: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and LinkedIn.
  • Take notes of your experience. Your notes should be grounded in the advice from the articles. Your notes will be the basis and foundation for your blog post.
  • Answer all required questions in the assignment (broadly speaking, you must compare the organizations’ social media presence, suggest three reasons why each organization is using social media effectively, and three pieces of advice for each organization).

A Focus on Twitter: Basics to Understand Before Your Live Tweeting Assignment (Blog Post #9)

Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).

Establish a voice. There is a lot of noise out there. To get engaged and get noticed, you’ll need to decide what “face” you want to reveal to the Twittersphere.

  • For me, @klandreville, my twitter voice is related to political communication and news research, teaching, and education.
  • For @Anna_Rader, one of our guest speakers, her voice is “NPR junkie, music lover, cinephile, Wyomingite, nerd. Digital Media Coordinator @WYPublicRadio and Digital Producer of @HumaNatureShow. Opinions are my own.”
  • Brainstorm about your Twitter voice.

Once you have a voice and identity in mind, find similar people to follow. To engage with a like-minded community, search for people to follow at “Who To Follow.” Twitter will suggest some people after you write your identity summary and begin posting.

Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.

Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.

  • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.

Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.

  • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.

Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.

  • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
  • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
  • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”

Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.

  • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat.
  • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”

State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.

  • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
  • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
  • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
  • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”

Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:

  • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Crowdsource. Use followers for information. Make a call or solicit them for information.

  • Find anecdotes and exemplars for stories. Denver Post did this to find the human face to their story on parents stealing their childrens’ identities and then raiding their credit.
  • Collect data using Google Docs to create a Google Form. Then, share link on social media for quick, informal surveys. Denver Post used this technique to find people live-blog their responses to the first 2012 presidential debate in Denver.

 

Picture1

The Denver Post crowdsourced for their article on parents stealing their children’s identity.

 

Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

More Advice from Twitter Experts at the BBC Journalism Academy: Below is a summary of the best tips.

  • Keep tweets simple.
  • Promote your content and work. Ask a simple question and link to the content. The idea is to intrigue, not give away all the content.
  • Avoid “clickbait” which is perceived as a marketing ploy and game to people.
  • Do not tweet too much of one side of an argument. It appears as if you are promoting them. Be balanced, even with Twitter content and attention.
  • Do not use too many hashtags (limit to two). It drowns the message.
  • Use images and videos if they add to the content. No stock photos or mundane photos.
  • Be helpful, open, honest and authentic. Be funny (in a professional and clever way) and social.
  • Think dialogue, not monologue.
  • Don’t retweet without reading and checking the retweeted content first.
  • Check the grammar and spelling!
  • “The don’ts? Don’t tweet angry, vengeful or drunk. Always be yourself.”  — @tomfordyce, chief sports writer @BBCSport

Live-Tweeting Practice

We will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Report from a journalistic point of view. Type out your tweets and try to keep them less than 140 characters.

HSI, Day 7: Ethics of Media Consumerism

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Generation Like, Corporate Marketing, and You

We will watch a PBS Frontline episode about this topic. Then, we’ll write a blog post and discuss.

  • What messages and information do you remember the most from the video? What “spoke” to you as a teen in “Generation Like”?
  • Did anything surprise you about the video?
  • Do you think the practice of integrating advertising/marketing into social media is ethical, appropriate, and acceptable? Or, do you think this practice is irritating, unethical, or inappropriate?
  • Did you know what “selling-out” was before you saw the video? Do you think it’s a problem or a concern? — Check out a music video from a 90’s ska band that is all about “selling-out”. (Silly fact: I saw this band live when I was in college! Lol…)
  • Do you have any other thoughts about the video clips you saw?

Activity: Identifying the Hidden Persuaders in Advertising

Get into groups of 3. Look at the ads. Discuss the advertising techniques used. Discuss with the class.

Techniques:

  1. Bandwagon: Join the crowd. Everyone is buying it/using it/doing it.
  2. Testimonial: A famous person or authority claims the product is good.
  3. Image advertising: A product is associated with certain people, places, activities. The implied message is one of attractiveness, wealth, enjoyment, etc.
  4. Weasel: A promise is implied by using words like “usually” or “chances are.”
  5. Omission: Facts about the product are not told.
  6. Repetition: Saying it again and again.
  7. Scale: Making a product bigger or smaller.
  8. Association: Promising adventure, attractiveness, quality.
  9. Name-calling: Making the product seem better by using unpopular terms about the competition.

 

Summer Multimedia Internship at Pew Research Center

Organization Overview

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research in the areas of U.S. politics and policy views; media and journalism; internet and technology; religion and public life; Hispanic trends; global attitudes and U.S. social and demographic trends. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center’s work is carried out by a staff of 130.

Position Summary

The summer internship is a paid internship opportunity during the summer of 2015 (beginning in May or June 2015) for undergraduate students in their junior or senior year, recent college graduates, or graduate level students with an interest in digital video journalism. The Multimedia Intern will work to create visually compelling digital content to disseminate Pew Research Center’s findings and analysis to its key target audiences. Working under the supervision of the Art Director, they will help to conceptualize and create compelling ways to disseminate Center research through video, motion graphics, data visualization and animation.

Primary Responsibilities

  • Create fast-turnaround, high-quality video and motion-graphics products that adhere to Center design and data standards, for distribution via multiple channels including the Pew Research web site, social media, partner web sites, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.
  • Act as primary production resource for all phases of video production, including shooting, audio engineering, lighting and editing at Pew Research and remote locations
  • Provide guidance to other staff on fundamentals of video production
  • Work with other members of digital and communications teams to measure the success of multimedia offerings via analysis of web and social media analytics

Education/Training /Experience

  • Experience with all phases of creating high quality video, motion graphics or other multimedia products in a news or academic environment

Knowledge and Skill Requirements

  • Excellent editorial judgment and proven ability to create high quality digital video products
  • Interest in data journalism and presentation, and exacting standards to maintain accuracy in all work products
  • Knowledge of digital video cameras, audio and lighting principles
  • Experience with digital editing and motion-graphics software (FinalCut, AfterEffects, Motion, etc.) and knowledge of digital video compression and rendering standards
  • Knowledge of social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, etc.) and interest in using social media for content distribution and marketing
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Procedure

Applicant should send a résumé, cover letter (indicating where you learned of the opening) and portfolio/demo-reel links to careers@pewresearch.org. Responses can also be mailed to:

Human Resources Department
Pew Research Center
1615 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC  20036

We are an equal opportunity employer.

Internships at UW

Nick Popplewell of UW Athletics needs some social media and marketing interns for fall.

UW Media Relations (Milton Ontiveroz) needs one intern.

iMix 96.7 needs an intern for sales.

Big Brothers, Big Sisters: Outreach/Marketing Coordinator Job or Internship

Big Brothers Big Sisters is now accepting resumes for a full-time benefitted Outreach/Marketing Coordinator (This could also be a paid internship). Duties include: Marketing through print and oral media, assisting in social media, web page design and assisting with special events. Outreach duties include volunteer and youth recruitment and retention and community outreach. Person must be passionate about our mission, enjoy public speaking and have some knowledge of graphic design. This is an AmeriCorps opportunity. $5645 Educational Award available. 1 year requirement. Starts September 1st 2015. E-mail resume and cover letter to Barbara@wyobbbs.org.

This is a great opportunity for currently enrolled or recently graduated students to get hands-on experience coordinating marketing efforts at a local non-profit agency.

Learning opportunities will include:

  • Creating brochures, flyers, advertisements, and other various marketing materials
  • Planning and implanting marketing techniques
  • Capturing program participant stories
  • Coordinating the Greater Wyoming Big Brothers Big Sisters social media presence
  • Taking part in various community service activities
  • Supporting other staff and assisting in other duties as assigned
  • Understanding the business functions of a non-profit

Please let me or Barbara Humphreys (Barbara@wyobbbs.org) know if you have any questions!

Thank you!

Robin Rasmussen

AmeriCorps Marketing and Outreach

Big Brothers Big Sisters

robin@wyobbbs.org

(307) 742-2227

An Exercise in Juggling: Live-Tweeting Speeches

Now that you know more about how to use social media for storytelling, we are going to live-report a newsworthy event using Twitter.

Think of this exercise as an exercise in juggling. You have to watch, listen, type (or write), and tweet. This is preparation for your live tweeting assignment. Let’s take a look at the Blog Post 9 – Live Tweeting Project

It will be helpful to do a few practice runs first. Let’s watch Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Speech.

First, open a Word file. I want you to type as much as information, notes, and direct quotes that you can from the speech. You may even write the tweets during the speech. But try not to miss anything!

Then, we’re going to take class time to create as many 140-character tweets as possible (with the hashtag #SteveJobs included in each tweet). Highlight the first sentence or two in your file. Is it 140 characters? How should you edit it? Is it important enough to tweet?

Aim for at least 10 tweets, but more is better. If this was a live event, your audience would want as many direct quotes from Jobs as possible.

After you’re done, we’ll share our tweets as a class by going around the room. This should give you an idea of the key moments of the speech. And you should double-check to ensure you captured those key moments of the speech in tweets you have written in your Word file.

This exercise should help you understand the process of live-tweeting.

If we have time, we will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Assignment Tips

  1. Be sure that you charge your smartphone before attending the event. If your phone runs out of battery and you’re supposed to be live-tweeting an event, that is no excuse to a boss in the future.
  2. Write down interview notes and information before you live tweet them. Don’t try to tweet on your phone as you’re interviewing someone. Construct tweets on paper or using your phone’s “notepad” before tweeting on Twitter.
  3. Dress professionally and/or appropriate for the event that you’re covering. Dressing up makes you look professional and people may take you more seriously.
  4. Re-read your tweet before you publish it. Edit it, if needed. If you do make a mistake, you can delete the wrong tweet and then publish a corrected tweet.

Social Media Apprenticeship Opportunity

Bright Agrotech, LLC is looking for a volunteer intern to assist with social media. Check out the details.

 

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