Media Literacy, Blogging, & Photography

UW High School Institute

Tag: multimedia (page 1 of 7)

HSI, Class 1: Welcome, Class Goals, Media Literacy, & Blog Setup

Let Me Introduce Myself…

I’m Dr. Kristen D. Landreville, PhD (2010, The Ohio State University). I’m an associate professor and the director of graduate studies in the Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of Wyoming.

But, you can call me “Kristen.”

I’ve lived in the Northeast, South, Midwest, and now the West. And, I love Wyoming. I’ve lived here with my family for 7 years. My husband is getting his PhD in chemical engineering. I have three daughters (ages 9, 4, and 3) who you will meet tomorrow at my house for dinner. They always LOVE the high school students each year and they are very excited to meet you.

At UW, I regularly teach courses in multimedia production, web design, political communication, and quantitative research methods. I’ve also taught media writing, magazine and feature writing, introduction to mass media, and media literacy. I’m teaching a new science journalism course next year, too.

I research topics like political campaigns, political narratives and media (e.g., political humor/satire, political documentaries/movies, political news), and the intersection of politics, science, and narratives.

Your class is my 5th HSI class. I keep coming back to teach at HSI because I love meeting, teaching, learning from, and interacting with exceptional high school students in Wyoming. I’m proud to say that several of my former HSI students are now my COLLEGE students at UW! So, I am very excited for these next few weeks together.

Who Are You?

Name

Hometown

What is your favorite media activity and why? For example, listening to music, reading books, watching movies, checking and updating social media, taking photos, blogging, making videos, etc.

Goals for the Class:

  1. Becoming “Media Literate”
  2. Understanding Blogging and WordPress
  3. Expressing Your Thoughts About Media in a Professional, Critical, and Personal Style
  4. Becoming More Open-Minded About Diverse/Different Points of View
  5. Participating in a Community of Students Who Support and Encourage, Yet Also Challenge, One Another
  6. Using Creative Devices to Improve Your Photography
  7. HAVE FUN!

Side note: While you are allowed to challenge each other and question each other, you are NOT ALLOWED to be rude, mean, condescending, superior, and just plain ugly to other people based on their opinions, views, orientations, gender, race, age, capabilities, etc.

Discussion of Media Literacy

Define media literacy. How does it impact you?

Part of understanding how media impacts your life is dependent on how “media literate” you are. Let’s formally define what skills it takes to become “media literate”. (Note: Adapted from Stanley J. Baran’s “Introduction to Mass Communication”, 8th edition).

The ability and willingness to make an effort to understand content, pay attention, and to filter out noise — The quality of our meaning making is related to the effort we give it.

An understanding of and respect for the power of media messages — Break down the third-person effect

The ability to distinguish emotional from reasoned reactions when responding to content and to act accordingly — Ask yourself, “Why does this content make me feel this way?”

Development of heightened expectations of media content — Expect more from your media content

A knowledge of genre conventions and the ability to recognize when they are being mixed — Realize that news, entertainment, and marketing are all mixed now

The ability to think critically about media messages, no matter how credible their sources — Analyze your news source from a balanced and objective point-of-view

A knowledge of the internal language of various media and the ability to understand its effects, no matter how complex — Understand how production values (e.g., lighting, editing, special effects, music, camera angle, location on the page, and size and placement of headline) impact the audience

We will cover most of these 7 skills in our class. My goal is for you to view media–ads, movies, news, TV, Facebook, etc.–in a whole new way after this class. Be empowered by media literacy!

Blogging Your HSI Story and Media Literacy Experience: WordPress Blog Setup

For your blog, you’ll be posting your classwork here, but I strongly encourage you to also post other thoughts to your blog, like posting some of your HSI feelings and experiences.

So think of your blog as like a continually updated “live” storytelling portfolio. Google yourself right now. What website pops up first? If you post to your blog frequently, then your blog may pop up first (which is what you want). And in the future, you want employers to find your blog when they Google you. So keep updating it!

And you may want to connect your blog to your greater online presence. Post the blog link to your profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and any other online presence you have.

Once you have your blog set up, you need to post! Good blogs do the following:

  • Update frequently
  • Write in the first-person (i.e., “I think) and use conversation-style that shows your personality
  • Provide specific headlines
  • Provide links elsewhere to helpful information
  • Allow readers to comment and comment back to readers
  • Are ongoing conversations among members of a community
  • Can be your professional portfolio, journal, or brainstorming session
  • Embed photos, video, audio, and other multimedia features
  • Are relatively short, usually less than 800 words

Now that you know more about blogging, let’s go to WordPress.com and get your blog setup.

Example HSI Student Blogs

Let’s look at a few examples of HSI student blogs from last year. In particular, please read their “last day” posts. These students have some helpful hints and messages for you today!

Blogging Workshop

  • Create an “about” page
    • Your name. You do not have to use your real name anywhere on the blog if you want to preserve your privacy. But, you must tell me what your blog name is so I can link to it from our class blog.
    • Some demographic information, such as where you are from and what your family is like.
    • What the purpose of this blog is (e.g., it’s to showcase your storytelling work and/or express your memories and experiences from HSI).
    • Some interests and what you like to do in your spare time.
    • Your career goals.
  • Linking to other web pages
  • Posting photos and inserting other media or files

 Write Your First Blog Post

  • Create a new post
  • Using categories
  • Using tags
  • Saving drafts
  • Changing the visibility
  • Publishing the post

Let’s address these initial topics. Remember the blogging tips. Remember to look for relevant photos and links on the web to include on your post. Let’s write.

  1. Your HSI Experience So Far
    • Explain how you were nominated for HSI. Why did you want to participate in HSI?
    • What do you expect or hope to learn from your HSI classes? From your fellow HSI classmates? What do you expect or hope to learn about yourself?
    • How has your HSI experience been so far? Is it what you expected?
    • Is there anything about HSI that you are NOT looking forward to?
  2. Reading Past HSI Students’ Blogs
    • What information did you find insightful or helpful on past HSI students’ blogs?
    • Was there anything on the past students’ blogs that surprised you?

Video Storytelling

The ability to tell a good story with video is a difficult yet important skill for journalists and communicators to learn. Video is not just on TV anymore — you can find video stories online and on mobile devices as well. You’ll work in teams of two for this project. Let’s partner up and review the instructions for Blog Post 10 – Video Storytelling.

Important video to watch if you’re shooting with your iPhone.

1. Pre-Production (Before You Shoot)

Choose a story (or event!) that is well suited for video. This includes stories that have strong visual components and that have any sort of motion.

Identify your sources. Seek out multiple and diverse perspectives for your story.

Write preliminary interview questions after researching the story. Plan out your questions, story focus, and narrative (i.e., beginning, middle, and end) in advance, as much as you can. However, also remember to be adaptable during the interview and ask appropriate follow-up questions.

“Show me, don’t tell me” is the mantra in video storytelling. Find a way to show a story unfolding with video. Minimize the on-camera interviews with people (i.e., “talking head interviews”). It’s more interesting to watch an event occur rather than here about it from an interviewee.

Plan to shoot a variety of angles and types of shots. For suggestions, see Production, below.

Consider how you (the reporter) will fit into the story. Will you appear on-camera to set the scene or conduct an interview? If you’d like to try that, go ahead! Or, will you be completely invisible to the audience, just like you were during the Soundslides project and the audio profile project? Or, will you narrate the story without appearing on-camera?

2. Production (When You’re On-Location)

Plan on shooting before and after the event (if shooting an event). This ensures you have a variety of material to create your edited story from. Also, it helps develop a narrative of before, during, and after the event.

Shoot B-roll. B-roll is supplemental footage that relates to your story. For example, a video story about the the UW track team’s meet should include video of athletes warming up, tying their shoelaces, talking with coaches, etc. These are the shots that you can use to fill time while an interviewee is talking or while ambient noise (e.g., background noise from the event or music) is playing. For a 2-minute story, shoot at least 30 seconds of B-roll footage.

Shoot on-camera interviews with your sources. When shooting interviews, remember to look around at your surroundings. Is it relevant to the story? Can you move somewhere else to get the interview that is not as chaotic or loud? Just as with the audio interviews, encourage your sources to relax, act natural, and provide context to the answer they are giving to your question. Don’t be afraid to re-shoot a question and ask a question again. Oftentimes, the source gives a better and more eloquent answer to your question the second time you ask it.

Optional: Shoot on-camera reporters. If you’d like to appear on-camera as a broadcaster at some point, then this project is a good opportunity to practice. You can introduce the story and provide context to the significance of the story. You can transition with your voice and appearance between story segments. And you can conclude the story and provide a summary or “what happens next” statement.

Shoot a variety of camera shots. Whether you plan to be a visual journalist or not, you need to understand and learn how to execute the types of shots. See this website for visual examples and descriptions as we go over the definitions below.

  • Extreme wide shots. Shows the whole entire scene of an event, location, or story. These shots give viewers information about where the story takes place. They set the scene and give context early on in a story.
  • Very wide shots. Shows less background and shows the subject in the large scene. The subject is barely visible.
  • Wide shots. Shows the whole subject so the visual emphasis is on the subject rather than the background.
  • Mid shots. Shows the subject even closer, but a bit of the scene is still visible in the frame.
  • Medium close-up shots. Shows the subject even closer and the subject’s features and expressions are more of the focus.
  • Close-up shots. Shows the subject’s head to shoulder area.
  • Extreme close-up shots. Shows only the subject in the frame, such as the subject’s eyes and nose.
  • Cut-in shots. Shows some other part of the main subject, not the face and shoulders.
  • Cutaway shots. B-roll that is used as transitions between shots or to add information not offered by shots of the main subject or scene.
  • Point-of-view shots. Shows a scene from the subject’s perspective such that you feel like you are in their shoes.

Optional: Camera movement techniques. Camera movements are more advanced production techniques. They may not work out well if you do not have a high-quality video camera. Thus, I would avoid these techniques unless you have prior experience with video or unless you have a high-quality video camera. If you decide to use camera movements, see the techniques below:

  • Zooming: Going from wide-angle to close-up or vice versa.
  • Panning: Moving the camera horizontally.
  • Tilts: Moving the camera vertically.
  • Tracking: Moving the camera around accordingly to track the subject.

Composition concerns: Give headroom so the interviewee has space above their head during the shot. Avoid distractions in the background of shots. Remember the rule of thirds still!

Be Flexible: No matter home much planning you do in pre-production, from deciding who you want to interview to what types of b-roll shots you want, something is bound to not go your way, or the event you’re at will be different than you envisioned. Be willing to change you plan during production based on what is happening at the event in real time.

3. Post-Production (The Editing Process)

Editing programs. You have access to Adobe Premiere Elements in this lab, CR 207, as well as Ross Hall 423 (next to my office), AS 228, and the IT building computer lab. However, you are free to use another editing program, such as iMovie, FinalCutPro, or Windows Movie Maker. Adobe Premiere and FinalCutPro are the industry standards for video editing. iMovie is pretty good for being a standard software on a MacBook. Windows Movie Maker is pretty awful and I don’t recommend it unless you have no other options. Also, consider downloading  a trial version of Adobe Premiere. The IT building has a beautiful Mac computer in the scantron room that has FinalCutPro on it.

Conceptual Editing. You want to brainstorm and plan out your story before you begin with technical editing. You want to have the story flow ironed out first. If you’re stuck, think about how you’d tell a friend your story. What did you start with? What else did you tell your friend? How does the story end? Also, search for sound bites that address the who, what, where, when, why, how, and so what.

The video editing process is similar to the audio editing process. Remember the tips associated with audio editing.

Keep your story focused — it’s supposed to be about 2-4 minutes.

Project Requirements

Below are the main points you need to consider while working on your project. I will use these elements to evaluate your work.

  • At least 2 sources
  • At least 5 seconds of ambient noise, natural sound, or music
  • Video is between 2 and 4 minutes
  • Video shots are diverse (see camera shots and camera movements above)
  • Speakers are introduced with titles and/or the speaker self-identifies themselves and/or the reporter identifies the speaker
  • Story has a beginning, middle, and end (narrative arc)
  • Editing is smooth

Video Storytelling for Public Relations, Promotions, and Marketing

Video can be used for a variety of different reasons including journalism, PR, marketing, and advertising, and the way that you edit and shoot a video is a little bit different for each one. In each case you want to be able to tell a complete story.

Journalism: Tell the whole story from all sides. Find opposing arguments for interviews so that viewers can get facts from both sides or multiple sources with different things to say. Add b-roll that is relevant to the story even if it is not the most artsy shot it might be the most informative.

Public Relations: In this case you will probably only be telling the story from one side, the side that the company, department, etc. is on, and you video will likely be positive, factual information about the company, etc. the b-roll shots in this type of video should highlight those positive things that the interviewee is talking about. Example

Promotions: These videos are a lot like advertisements. To make an exciting promotional video, you want eye catching shots, that include whatever it is that you’re promoting. A lot of the time these are artistic shots, or fast pace shots that keep the viewer engaged, and interested. Example

Video Storytelling Examples From Past Classes

Example of Promotional Story on a Local Company – Louisa Wilkinson and Taylor Dilts

Example of Journalistic Story on a Non-Event – Hannah Robinson and Esther Seville

Example of a Promotional Story on a Local Band – Kaisha McCutchen and Bianca Coca

Example of Journalistic Approach with No Reporter Narration – Edward Timmons and Miranda Anderson

Example of Journalistic Approach  With Reporter Narrative – Jordan Blazovich and Nick Robinson

Example of Journalistic Approach to an Event Story without Reporter Narration – Kaitlyn Camargo and Lauren Garrelts

Example of Journalistic Approach to a Non-event Story without Reporter Narration – Brittany Hamilton and Scottie Melton

Example of Promotional Approach – Courtney Gifford, Travis Hoff, Sam Weinstein
Border War: The ROTC Story

Gathering Audio – The Artform

Audio Interviewing Tips

Gathering audio that is clean, clear, and crisp is no easy task. This post outlines some hints for you to consider before you conduct audio interviews. It is developed from the hints listed on MediaStorm’s audio training page.

Know Your Equipment: Be comfortable operating your audio recorder. You should know where the buttons are without looking at it. You should know what all of the buttons do. If you’re uncomfortable with the audio recorder, your subject will be as well.

  • So, practice with your audio recorder, even if it’s just your phone, BEFORE your interview.
  • Also, be sure that you can confidently get the audio file from your phone to a computer and opened in Audacity. Practice now.

Location: Find a quiet location with little background noise. Find a spot with soft surfaces that absorb sound. A couch or fabric chair is better than a wooden chair. Cover a table with a blanket. A car with closed windows is a great location. Avoid hallways and large rooms that echo.

No Ambient Noise During Interview: While you do want to use ambient noise in your audio story, you don’t want the ambient noise to interfere with the person speaking to you. Avoid consistent background noise by picking a small quiet room with carpet and soft chairs. If using the TASCAM, try using the foam covering to see if it helps quiet ambient noise. You want to collect ambient noise separately and not fight it during the interview.

If Ambient Noise is Unavoidable: Press the record button before you begin the formal interview. Allow the recorder to collect the ambient noise without anyone’s voices interrupting the ambient noise. This gives you clean ambient noise to insert into any pauses during the editing process.

Get Close: Put the microphone about 2 inches away from the person’s mouth if you’re recording at a moderate “rec level” (about 5-7 on the TASCAM). You can put the microphone farther away if you’re recording at a higher “rec level” (about 9-10).

  • Remember though — when editing, it’s easier to bump up the volume than bump down the volume. Thus, err on the side of caution and do not record at a level that is TOO LOUD.

Use Headphones: Put your headphones into the headphone jack on your digital audio recorder. Hit the “record” button. Now ask the person to talk. Ensure that you can hear the person clearly. If you can’t hear them clearly, put the microphone closer to their mouth and/or increase the “rec level” to a higher sensitivity. Keep the headphones on your ears during the whole interview. You’ll know exactly how the person sounds the whole time.

Speak Up: Ask the person to speak up and speak louder if you can’t hear them properly and clearly when you have your headphones on.

Don’t Fidget: Do not fidget and play with the audio recorder while gathering sound. The audio recorder picks up the noise when you rub your hands on it. Avoid this by not fidgeting.

Focus: There’s many things to think about while conducting an audio interview. Can you hear them clearly? What are they saying? What’s my next question? Where is the interview going? How can I take the interview in a different direction or somewhere I hadn’t planned if they say something interesting?

  • If you don’t get the 5-minute interview right the first time, do it again!

But Also Engage: Listen to the person. Make eye contact (don’t look at their mouth). Seem genuinely interested in their story. After they’re done speaking, stay in silence for a moment. They may add more detail to their thoughts.

Uh huh: Don’t do it. Avoid saying those filler words during an interview. You don’t want YOUR voice recorded when the person is talking. Instead, nod, smile, use eye contact, and lean forward to encourage the person.

Avoid Comment. Resist the urge provide in-depth responses or comments to your interviewee during and after everything he/she says–that means more editing for yourself or not being able to use the audio at all.

Pause. During the audio interview, leave a brief pause after the interviewee finishes answering a question and before you begin your next question. Giving more pause will leave you more room for editing.

Ask Explanation-Needed Questions: Don’t just ask, “How old were you when you first realized you wanted to be a journalist?” You’ll get the answer, “I few years ago.” Ask questions that need more explanation, “What inspired you to become a journalist and when did you make this decision in your life?”

  • You want the person to answer in complete sentences that clearly answer the question, not short phrases that may need a narrator’s explanation.

Ask Again: Don’t be afraid to ask “Why?;” “Please explain that more in-depth.” “Please say that again, I didn’t quite understand the first time.”

Ask Sensory Questions: “Tell me about…”; “What did it sound like when…”; “How did it feel when…”; “What did it smell like…”; “What did it look like when…”; “Describe the scene for me.”

Last Question: Always ask, “Is there anything else I should have asked? Is there anything else you want me to know?”

Audio Editing Tips

Consider these audio editing suggestions.

  1. Decide how you want to organize your story before you begin editing; know what the beginning, middle, and end should be before you begin editing.
  2. The end should bring closure and finality to the interview topic. Don’t end with a statement that leads to more questions from the listener.
  3. Use the zoom feature extensively during your editing, it really helps get the cut to be as flawless as possible.
  4. There are two ways to edit audio: Build or destroy. To build while editing, take a blank audio track and then create an interview from the original. To destroy while editing, take the original interview and cut it down.
  5. While editing, write down the points in the track that you’re working on. That way when you go back and listen to it, you can listen for the cut/transition and move things around faster by referencing those breaks in your notes.
  6. Always save the original audio file separate from the file that you’re currently editing. Also consider saving “editions” of your audio file such that each audio editing session that you engage in is a unique file. That way, if you make a grievous error, then you can revert to the next most saved/updated/edited file.

SoundCloud

In our unit on audio, you will use Soundcloud to share your audio files on your blog. Let’s register.

Practice

There is no better way to learn audio reporting than by trying it out for yourself! So, let’s try to record ourselves on our phones or devices. Let’s get it off our phone and on the computer. Can you open it in Audacity? Or, do you need to convert the file? Google your questions about your specific phone or device.

Audio Storytelling

Journalism oftentimes gives a voice to the voiceless. With audio journalism, you can hear the emotion, hear the ambient sounds, and hear the expressions of your sources. Now, we can do audio journalism online and not just on the radio. Before we learn about the logistics of audio, it is important to first understand what makes excellent audio journalism. Here are some examples.

One in 8 Million – A New York Times audio slideshow about a few of the 8 million people living in the New York City region. Let’s listen to one teenager mother’s story.  Let’s listen to the audio profile and discuss what you like and dislike about the story. Could this story be told better with any other style or method? Note that for the upcoming two assignments, you will interview a classmate (or someone else) for 5 minutes and then edit the audio to 2 minutes.

NPR provides the best audio journalism in the United States. Here’s an example of their reporting. Notice the journalist’s narration, the sources’ quotes, and the audio of specific examples relevant to the story. First though, let’s read the print story. Then, we’ll listen to the audio story. We’ll compare the stories and discuss the differences as well as the similarities.

This American Life provides great long-format audio stories, usually about feature stories.

Audio Profile Project

Please download the instructions for the Blog Posts 6 and 7 – Raw Audio Profile and Edited Audio Profile and we’ll review what you’ll be accomplishing with audio!

SoundCloud

In our unit on audio, you will use Soundcloud to share your audio files on your blog. Let’s register and do a tutorial.

Practice Audio Recording with Your Device

Let’s practice audio recording and getting the audio files off our devices and onto the computer. The biggest complaint that students have about the audio unit is having trouble getting the audio off their device and onto the computer in a workable file format. So, please do that now.

Record yourself counting to 10 with your device. Next, get the recording off your device and onto the computer. Attempt to open the file in Audacity. Then, attempt to upload a file to Soundcloud.

Evaluating Multimedia

Note: There will be a quiz on this material on Wed. 9/7. Be aware of current events in the news as well. 10 questions, 10 points.

Navigation, Interactivity, and Usability: Ch. 4 Highlights

All media-content creators need to think about how the audience will experience and explore their work. Good multimedia presentations are intuitive and easy to explore. There is little confusion of where to click next or where to go for a particular piece of information –> this is called good “usability”.

If there is confusion with understanding the navigation (i.e., exploring the content) or the interactivity (i.e., the control the user has over the content), then there are problems with usability. Major usability problems can create frustration and anger within the user, and users  may abandon your content. Leaving the website is the easiest thing to do when there are literally hundreds of other places to get their news, product information, entertainment, etc. This is clearly not the path you want your user to take.

You want your user to fully explore and experience whatever media content you create. You didn’t spent all that time and effort for nothing. So let’s review some quick tips.

Navigation Tips

  1. Keep navigation simple: Limit choices. Avoid scroll bars and drop-down menus. Avoid layers and layers of navigation.
  2. Make navigation buttons large enough for a finger touch, not just a mouse click.
  3. Place controls and navigation in logical places. We glance pages from left-to-right and top-to-bottom. Set up navigation and controls that reflect this.
  4. Integrate multimedia into text, so if users what to explore the multimedia while reading the text, they can take a detour. This is nonlinearity.
  5. But be sure you make it easy for users to return to the previous content. –> Don’t remove key navigational buttons that were available before.
  6. Don’t change the position and location of links.
  7. Try not to offer more than 7 options for primary navigation. Exceeding 7 can overwhelm.
  8. Use clear labels and descriptions to users don’t guess where a button or link will take them.
  9. Use clean, simple design so it is easy to read and view your content.
  10. Conduct usability tests! (see more detail below)

Information Design Tips

Now, let’s read (re)defining multimedia journalism. Key points:

  1. Complement, don’t repeat.
  2. Integrate media types.
  3. Simplify. Only include essentials.
  4. Grab the audience’s attention visually.
  5. Nonlinear does not need to be complicated.
  6. Low interactivity is okay.
  7. Immersive experiences rule.
  8. Good journalistic judgment is still needed.

Usability Tests

A usability test is an observation and interviewing task that involves watching users interact with the content and then asking users questions about the multimedia package’s navigation and interactivity. It provides valuable feedback for how effective the content presentation is.

And research shows that you do not need to conduct dozens of usability tests to improve your content presentation. Only 5 people are needed to reveal about 80% of the problems with a multimedia presentation. If you want to eliminate nearly 100% of the problems, then only 15 people are needed. Completely achievable.

The rest of class today will be dedicated to conducting a usability test on a multimedia presentation. You will first take the usability test yourself. You will record your answers. Then, you will ask another person (not in this class) to take the usability test as well. You will write a blog post that compares your usability test with the other person’s usability test. You will make some recommendations about what is helpful and successful and what is confusing and needs improvement. See full instructions for Blog Post 2 – Usability Test on Multimedia

WordPress Setup and Workshop

First, it’s important to know that there are different types of blogs. Let’s visit these examples to see how people in our field are using blogs. Most major news organizations have journalist-authored blogs. For example, The New York Times has a large directory of journalist-authored blogs. My personal favorite is the LENS blog of photojournalism.  There are also many public relations oriented blogs as well: Cision, Bulldog Reporter, and and Holmes Report are a few top PR blogs.

For your blog, you’ll be posting your class assignments here to showcase your journalistic work, but I strongly encourage you to also post your thoughts, comments, goals, brainstorming ideas, etc. on your blog to practice your online writing skills and showcase your media work.

To be more successful with your media career, you need to create a brand for yourself by working hard at creating solid media stories. Let’s read to some branding principles.

Part of creating a brand, or a good reputation, is to know how to showcase your stellar ideas and high-quality professional work. So, feel free to post other professional material or thoughts to your blog, in addition to your required assignments for class.

In the end, you’re competing with hundreds of other students for those media jobs. Let’s take a look at recent journalism job and PR job postings.

So think of your blog as like a continually updated “live” resume and portfolio. Google yourself right now. What website pops up first? If you post to your blog frequently, then your blog may pop up first (which is what you want). You want employers to find your blog when they Google you. So keep updating it!

And you may want to connect your blog to your greater online presence. Post the blog link to your profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and any other online presence you have.

Blogging Workshop

  • Create a WordPress account
  • Create an “about” page
    • Your name.
    • Some demographic information, such as where you are from and what your family is like.
    • What the purpose of this blog is (e.g., it’s to showcase your storytelling work).
    • Some interests and what you like to do in your spare time.
    • Your career goals.
  • Linking to other web pages
  • Posting photos and inserting other media or files

 

Write Your First Blog Post: See Your Blog 1 Assignment

  • Create a new post
  • Using categories
  • Using tags
  • Saving drafts
  • Publishing the post

 

Guidelines To Follow For Blog Writing

  • Update frequently
  • Write in the first-person (i.e., “I think) and use conversation-style that shows your personality
  • Provide specific headlines
  • Provide links elsewhere to helpful information
  • Allow readers to comment and comment back to readers
  • Are ongoing conversations among members of a community
  • Can be your professional portfolio, journal, or brainstorming session
  • Embed photos, video, audio, and other multimedia features
  • Are relatively short, usually less than 800 words

 

IMPORTANT: To log in to your WordPress blog, you can visit your blog url plus a “/wp-admin” at the end of the url. For example, to edit my blog, I go to “http://uwyojournalism.com/wp-admin”.  Alternatively, you can sign in through WordPress.com.

Last points: If you need any help setting up your blog and I’m not available for question, then try an online tutorial.

Introduction to Multimedia Production

Welcome!

About Me

(Education, Professional Goals, Hobbies, Family)

About You

(Name, Major, Year, What do you hope to learn in this course?, What’s something fun you did this summer?)

Why This WordPress Blog?

We’ll use this class blog to post course materials and students’ work. Course materials include assignment guidelines, rubrics, and the syllabus. See our page, COJO 3530: Fall 2016 on the sidebar.

We will also use WyoCourses for grades and quizzes, in addition to the assignment instructions and rubrics.

Plus, I require YOU to keep a blog, so I should keep one as well for our class.

What Will We Do?

Let’s take a look at the syllabus and find out.

What Do You Know?

Let’s get started. First, a fun news quiz. Let’s see how much you know about local, state, national, and international current events. And no peeking for answers on the Internet.

What Should You Know and Why?

Second, visit The New York Times multimedia page to get a taste of what the future of journalism looks like. Take 10 minutes (I’m timing you) and explore anything that grabs your interest.

What did you explore? What was interesting and engaging ? Did you quickly leave the story, or did you spend a long time on the story? Why?

These are the critical questions you need to be asking yourself whenever you read ANYTHING now, especially when you engage with multimedia stories. If you want to be in the business of telling and selling stories, then you need to develop the critical thinking skills to understand what makes me (the reader/user) keep reading.

In this class, you’ll begin to learn the basic skills that are needed to succeed in multimedia communication. I say “communication” in addition to “journalism” because I strongly believe that even if you aren’t a journalism major, you will learn from this class. If your career interests lie in public relations, marketing, advertising, or public affairs, you will learn key skills in multimedia that will help you get a job.

Multimedia Production on Your Blog

In order to promote your media career, I require students to maintain a professional blog throughout the semester. You can show potential employers your multimedia work through this platform. Please visit former COJO 3530 student blogs (see left-hand column) for ideas about your own blog. You’ll also see what kind of storytelling that you’ll be engaging in during the semester.

This class is a big step in the right direction for your journalism or media career. I hope you’re excited!

So let’s set up your WordPress blog now. You need to submit your Blog Post 1 and About Page Setup by next Thursday.

***A Word of Advice: Proofread your writing. Like, seriously proofread. Writing that has spelling, grammar, typographical (e.g., typing a word twice or writing “if” instead of “it”), or capitalization errors (e.g., writing “i like news”) is not “A” work (see the grading rubric–a “B” is the highest grade you can get if any of these errors is made). Your multimedia story may be fantastic, but if your blog post writing has any of these errors, you lose credibility with your audience. Thus, I read your writing VERY carefully, and I’m always looking for these errors. Don’t make them, please. ***

HSI, Day 7: Ethics of Media Consumerism

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Generation Like, Corporate Marketing, and You

We will watch a PBS Frontline episode about this topic. Then, we’ll write a blog post and discuss.

  • What messages and information do you remember the most from the video? What “spoke” to you as a teen in “Generation Like”?
  • Did anything surprise you about the video?
  • Do you think the practice of integrating advertising/marketing into social media is ethical, appropriate, and acceptable? Or, do you think this practice is irritating, unethical, or inappropriate?
  • Did you know what “selling-out” was before you saw the video? Do you think it’s a problem or a concern? — Check out a music video from a 90’s ska band that is all about “selling-out”. (Silly fact: I saw this band live when I was in college! Lol…)
  • Do you have any other thoughts about the video clips you saw?

Activity: Identifying the Hidden Persuaders in Advertising

Get into groups of 3. Look at the ads. Discuss the advertising techniques used. Discuss with the class.

Techniques:

  1. Bandwagon: Join the crowd. Everyone is buying it/using it/doing it.
  2. Testimonial: A famous person or authority claims the product is good.
  3. Image advertising: A product is associated with certain people, places, activities. The implied message is one of attractiveness, wealth, enjoyment, etc.
  4. Weasel: A promise is implied by using words like “usually” or “chances are.”
  5. Omission: Facts about the product are not told.
  6. Repetition: Saying it again and again.
  7. Scale: Making a product bigger or smaller.
  8. Association: Promising adventure, attractiveness, quality.
  9. Name-calling: Making the product seem better by using unpopular terms about the competition.

 

Summer Multimedia Internship at Pew Research Center

Organization Overview

Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research in the areas of U.S. politics and policy views; media and journalism; internet and technology; religion and public life; Hispanic trends; global attitudes and U.S. social and demographic trends. Pew Research Center does not take policy positions. It is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew Research Center’s work is carried out by a staff of 130.

Position Summary

The summer internship is a paid internship opportunity during the summer of 2015 (beginning in May or June 2015) for undergraduate students in their junior or senior year, recent college graduates, or graduate level students with an interest in digital video journalism. The Multimedia Intern will work to create visually compelling digital content to disseminate Pew Research Center’s findings and analysis to its key target audiences. Working under the supervision of the Art Director, they will help to conceptualize and create compelling ways to disseminate Center research through video, motion graphics, data visualization and animation.

Primary Responsibilities

  • Create fast-turnaround, high-quality video and motion-graphics products that adhere to Center design and data standards, for distribution via multiple channels including the Pew Research web site, social media, partner web sites, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.
  • Act as primary production resource for all phases of video production, including shooting, audio engineering, lighting and editing at Pew Research and remote locations
  • Provide guidance to other staff on fundamentals of video production
  • Work with other members of digital and communications teams to measure the success of multimedia offerings via analysis of web and social media analytics

Education/Training /Experience

  • Experience with all phases of creating high quality video, motion graphics or other multimedia products in a news or academic environment

Knowledge and Skill Requirements

  • Excellent editorial judgment and proven ability to create high quality digital video products
  • Interest in data journalism and presentation, and exacting standards to maintain accuracy in all work products
  • Knowledge of digital video cameras, audio and lighting principles
  • Experience with digital editing and motion-graphics software (FinalCut, AfterEffects, Motion, etc.) and knowledge of digital video compression and rendering standards
  • Knowledge of social media channels (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, etc.) and interest in using social media for content distribution and marketing
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills

Application Procedure

Applicant should send a résumé, cover letter (indicating where you learned of the opening) and portfolio/demo-reel links to careers@pewresearch.org. Responses can also be mailed to:

Human Resources Department
Pew Research Center
1615 L Street, NW, Suite 700
Washington, DC  20036

We are an equal opportunity employer.

Summer Journalism at NYU

Summer Journalism at NYU is an experience you won’t forget. We have a variety of classes for pre-college and college students, and one graduate multimedia production course, which is the course we are highlighting this week.

The Story We See is a four-week intensive multimedia class that is perfect for anyone wanting to improve or solidify their skills. You’ll report, shoot, edit, and publish a complete multimedia story. Two, actually. Taught by the highly experienced Adrian Mihai, it’s faced-paced, hands-on, hard work and–by student accounts–very memorable and rewarding.

Regarding other courses, this summer we’ve added three new ones to our already diverse line-up–Sports!, The Profilers, and a classic from our regular academic year, The Beat, with a long-time favorite professor, Frank Flaherty, which runs as a special 9-week course. First session courses start May 26 and second session courses run from July 7 to August 13.

Visit our website for a list of all the courses offered and to find out more about the program. Still have questions? Check out our FAQs, contact us at summer.journalism@nyu.edu, or connect with us on Facebook! Like our page to interact with current and prospective students, ask questions, and to keep up with the latest news about Summer Journalism.

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