Multimedia Production

A Communication & Journalism Course at the University of Wyoming

Tag: interviews

HSI, Class 11: Censorship & Ethics of Banning Books

The First Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Ethics of Banning Books

Now, let’s look at a list of books that are commonly banned. As you can see, the reasons often deal with foul language, racism, sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, and homosexuality. Also, let’s take a few minutes to read this article about how challenged books have changed over the decades.

Here is a video summary of 10 commonly banned books.

It’s important to realize that religious books and references are sometimes challenged as well. The Bible is a commonly challenged book, for example, because of content that some people find hateful and violent toward other groups such as LGBT people.

The sides of the debate are typically either:

  • Pro-censorship: Protect children, protect integrity of character
  • Anti-censorship: Protect free speech, do not shelter children from reality

Let’s talk about what these arguments mean.

Class Discussion:

  • Have your parents tried to prohibit you from reading a particular book?
  • Have you experienced any book challenges at school?
  • What side do you fall on? Why?
  • Who has impacted your thoughts on this topic?
  • If you are more anti-censorship, then what limits, if any, should be in place at public schools and libraries?
  • If you are more pro-censorship, then what would it take for you to support a book ban at a public school or library?

Case Study: And Tango Makes Three

Now let’s explore a case study of book banning. We’ll watch the clip together and then you’ll write a post that answers the questions below.

The local public library has banned the children’s book And Tango Makes Three. The book is based on the true story of Roy and Silo, two male Chinstrap Penguins in New York’s Central Park Zoo. The book follows the six years of their life where they formed a couple and were given an egg to raise.

Pick Out A Book At My Office!

Let’s walk over to my office in Ross Hall 435 and I’ll let you take a book home with you. While students are visiting my office in groups of 2-3, other students will be in Ross Hall 423 computer lab writing their blog posts on the questions below:

Blog Post: Book Banning

  1. Briefly summarize the book and its content
  2. Discuss both the pro-censorship and anti-censorship viewpoints.
  3. Was the ban at the local public library unwarranted? Or, was the ban appropriate? Use the First Amendment to defend your opinions. That is, even if you want to ban the book, explain how the First Amendment protects this decision. If you want to allow the book, explain how the First Amendment protects this decision.
  4. Do you have any personal experiences with your own school or parents banning books?
  5. How many books on the Top 10 Commonly Challenged Books Lists have you read? Which books have you read?
  6. What is your general opinion about book banning?
  7. Can organizations, schools, and families really “ban books” in our time of the internet and social media?

HSI, Class 4: Vedauwoo Photos & Critical Thinking About Your Online Identity

Happy Birthday to Makena!


Multimedia 

Post Your 10 Best Photos of Vedauwoo

Download and go through your photos. Pick and write a blog post about your Top 10 Best Photos of Vedauwoo.

After everyone is finished, let’s have a vote to see who captured the overall best photos!


 

Media Literacy

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Your Online Identity

Activity: Interactive on How Teens Share Information on Social Media

Teen Voices: Dating in a Digital World – This is a brief review of survey data and comments from teens about dating nowadays.

Our first discussion topic today revolves around your online identity. Check out this visual data about what teens are doing online.

More information about social media and teens in 2015.

Important note: There are no right or wrong answers to the blog post questions and discussion. In fact, more diversity in the class’s opinions is actually helpful. We get to learn more when people share their unique and genuine opinions.

Let’s write a blog post about these questions and discuss them as a class. Please answer:

  • How does your own online behavior compare to the data that we just examined?
  • How many limits do your parents put on your online identity and internet time?
  • How do you think your online identity should look for college? For when you want to get a job?
  • What privacy concerns exist for you and potential college admissions officers and employers?
  • Is it right for a college or employer to reject/fire you based on your online identity?

— My Thoughts —

Be proud of whatever you write on your blog and whatever you share online. You do not want to regret something in the future. Remember, if it’s posted online, it’s there F O R E V E R!

NPR’s Ira Glass

iraglass