Website Design

A website design course at the University of Wyoming

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Social Media Management for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

How Social Media is Used by the Big Three Media Fields

Social media is for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, or public relations manager, all of these fields rely on social media now.

You can use social media:

  • To help you create a presence and voice
  • To promote your stories or your products
  • To search for story ideas and sources
  • To network with others in your field
  • To engage with your audience, start a conversation

No doubt, social media is changing our media world. Let’s review some resources.

Please choose to review either the journalists, PR, or advertising sections below. Review each link in your chosen section. Write down 3 things that you’d like to share with the class about what you learned from reading these articles in your section.

There are also some helpful hints that could apply to journalism, public relations, and advertising. Keep up to date on these hints for social media at Social Media Examiner. Here are some of the most helpful posts and lessons that I’ve discovered on this website:

Critical Analysis and Comparison of Two Organizations’ Social Media Management

Blog Post #8 Due on Fri. Nov. 4 by 11:59 p.m. | Presentations of Results on Monday and Wednesday

For Blog Post 8, you will write a critical analysis and comparison of two organizations’ social media management styles. Download Blog Post 8 for details. Here’s the short version of the assignment:

  • As you sit down to do your analysis, be sure to review these links above that we’ve reviewed.
  • Use the specific advice offered in these articles as you conduct your analysis.
  • Examine the 6 major social media platforms noted in the assignment: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and LinkedIn.
  • Take notes of your experience. Your notes should be grounded in the advice from the articles. Your notes will be the basis and foundation for your blog post.
  • Answer all required questions in the assignment (broadly speaking, you must compare the organizations’ social media presence, suggest three reasons why each organization is using social media effectively, and three pieces of advice for each organization).

A Focus on Twitter: Basics to Understand Before Your Live Tweeting Assignment (Blog Post #9)

Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).

Establish a voice. There is a lot of noise out there. To get engaged and get noticed, you’ll need to decide what “face” you want to reveal to the Twittersphere.

  • For me, @klandreville, my twitter voice is related to political communication and news research, teaching, and education.
  • For @Anna_Rader, one of our guest speakers, her voice is “NPR junkie, music lover, cinephile, Wyomingite, nerd. Digital Media Coordinator @WYPublicRadio and Digital Producer of @HumaNatureShow. Opinions are my own.”
  • Brainstorm about your Twitter voice.

Once you have a voice and identity in mind, find similar people to follow. To engage with a like-minded community, search for people to follow at “Who To Follow.” Twitter will suggest some people after you write your identity summary and begin posting.

Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.

Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.

  • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.

Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.

  • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.

Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.

  • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
  • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
  • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”

Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.

  • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat.
  • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”

State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.

  • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
  • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
  • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
  • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”

Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:

  • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Crowdsource. Use followers for information. Make a call or solicit them for information.

  • Find anecdotes and exemplars for stories. Denver Post did this to find the human face to their story on parents stealing their childrens’ identities and then raiding their credit.
  • Collect data using Google Docs to create a Google Form. Then, share link on social media for quick, informal surveys. Denver Post used this technique to find people live-blog their responses to the first 2012 presidential debate in Denver.

 

Picture1

The Denver Post crowdsourced for their article on parents stealing their children’s identity.

 

Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

More Advice from Twitter Experts at the BBC Journalism Academy: Below is a summary of the best tips.

  • Keep tweets simple.
  • Promote your content and work. Ask a simple question and link to the content. The idea is to intrigue, not give away all the content.
  • Avoid “clickbait” which is perceived as a marketing ploy and game to people.
  • Do not tweet too much of one side of an argument. It appears as if you are promoting them. Be balanced, even with Twitter content and attention.
  • Do not use too many hashtags (limit to two). It drowns the message.
  • Use images and videos if they add to the content. No stock photos or mundane photos.
  • Be helpful, open, honest and authentic. Be funny (in a professional and clever way) and social.
  • Think dialogue, not monologue.
  • Don’t retweet without reading and checking the retweeted content first.
  • Check the grammar and spelling!
  • “The don’ts? Don’t tweet angry, vengeful or drunk. Always be yourself.”  — @tomfordyce, chief sports writer @BBCSport

Live-Tweeting Practice

We will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Report from a journalistic point of view. Type out your tweets and try to keep them less than 140 characters.

HSI, Day 7: Ethics of Media Consumerism

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Generation Like, Corporate Marketing, and You

We will watch a PBS Frontline episode about this topic. Then, we’ll write a blog post and discuss.

  • What messages and information do you remember the most from the video? What “spoke” to you as a teen in “Generation Like”?
  • Did anything surprise you about the video?
  • Do you think the practice of integrating advertising/marketing into social media is ethical, appropriate, and acceptable? Or, do you think this practice is irritating, unethical, or inappropriate?
  • Did you know what “selling-out” was before you saw the video? Do you think it’s a problem or a concern? — Check out a music video from a 90’s ska band that is all about “selling-out”. (Silly fact: I saw this band live when I was in college! Lol…)
  • Do you have any other thoughts about the video clips you saw?

Activity: Identifying the Hidden Persuaders in Advertising

Get into groups of 3. Look at the ads. Discuss the advertising techniques used. Discuss with the class.

Techniques:

  1. Bandwagon: Join the crowd. Everyone is buying it/using it/doing it.
  2. Testimonial: A famous person or authority claims the product is good.
  3. Image advertising: A product is associated with certain people, places, activities. The implied message is one of attractiveness, wealth, enjoyment, etc.
  4. Weasel: A promise is implied by using words like “usually” or “chances are.”
  5. Omission: Facts about the product are not told.
  6. Repetition: Saying it again and again.
  7. Scale: Making a product bigger or smaller.
  8. Association: Promising adventure, attractiveness, quality.
  9. Name-calling: Making the product seem better by using unpopular terms about the competition.

 

Twitter and Social Media for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

Twitter and social media are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and social media to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism (watch a quick video about how social media changes news reporting), public relations (watch a quick video from a VP of PR), and advertising (watch a video about the challenges of social media advertising).

Let’s tackle Twitter first. A video introduction.

Some uses:

    • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
    • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
      • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
    • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
      • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
    • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
      • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
      • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
      • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
    • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
      • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. I searched this recently and found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
      • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”
    • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see Topsy and SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.
      • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
      • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
      • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
      • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
    • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
      • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”
    • Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

PS – If you’re interested in using Social Media for Activism, please download a PowerPoint presentation that I made to the Good Mule conference in November 2012.

How *not* to use hashtags!

OK, so I had to share this hilarious hashtag skit from Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake. We’ll cover Twitter and social media in a few weeks, but this is a fun preview of what we’ll discuss when we address how *not* to use hashtags.

HSI, Day 2: Online Identity, Partner Pair Up, Profile Basics, & Writing Questions

Blogging Workshop

— Finish Blogging Workshop, if needed —

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Your Online Identity

Our first discussion topic today revolves around your online identity. Let’s write a quick blog post about these questions and discuss them as a class. Please answer:

  • How does your online identity look now?
  • How do you think your online identity should look for college? For when you want to get a job?
  • What privacy concerns exist for you and potential college admissions officers and employers?
  • Is it right for a college or employer to reject/fire you based on your online identity?
  • Is there a balance between professionalism and self-expression in the online world? Can you have both?

— My Thoughts —

Be proud of whatever you write on your blog and whatever you share online. You do not want to regret something in the future. Remember, if it’s posted online, it’s there F O R E V E R!

Partner Pair Up

Now that you’re familiar with your blog, we are going to pair up with a partner. Ultimately, you will write a complete personality profile about your partner (and they will write one about you) and post it to your blog.

Along the way, you will learn how to interview your partner, how to write a personality profile about your partner, how to use an audio recorder and editor to insert an audio-interview clip into your profile, and how to take high-quality photos so you can post a few photos of your partner and their HSI experience to your profile.

Sound daunting? Maybe. But, it’s not! I swear it will be a fun experience! And you’ll get a personality profile about yourself out of the process as well.

So let’s pair up! Get to know your partner for a few minutes.

What is a Personality Profile?

There is no such thing as an uninteresting person! Your job in this class project is to:

  • žResearch and interview the person to obtain most interesting tidbits
  • Present to readers a ‘snapshot of a life’ using interviews, observations and creative writing
  • žžConvey importance and uniqueness of person

Let’s take a look at some examples of personality profiles of students:

How Do I Write a Personality Profile?

— Activity: As we review each suggestion below, we will examine the example stories above. —

  • Research the person. Your partner will complete a short worksheet about themselves for you to develop questions from.
  • Ask interesting and explanation-required questions during the interview.
  • Find a theme.
  • Write an attention-grabbing lead (i.e., the first sentences of the story).
  • Organize the story using these ideas:
    1. Time frames: Start with the present (e.g., at HSI), go to the past, go back to the present, and end with the future.
    2. Sections: Use topical areas of the person’s life to organize the story (e.g., Academic Over-Achiever, Adding Volunteering and Academics, & Eye on College).
  • However, do not write in chronological order (i.e., “Kristen was born in New Bedford, Mass., and moved to Florida when she was 6. Then, she went to elementary school…).
  • Insert biographical information (e.g., age, hometown, high school, family) where and when they make sense in the story.
  • Weave strong quotes throughout the story. Include a quote every three paragraphs or so.
  • Don’t bury quotes in the middle or the end of a paragraph.
  • Use the active voice. OK writing: Kristen was cooking. Better writing: Kristen cooked.
  • Ask yourself: Have you answered all of the readers’ possible questions about this person?
  • End with a strong quote or paraphrased (i.e., summarized) statement that reflects the person well.

What Questions Should I Ask During My Personality Profile Interviews?

The secret to writing a good personality profile is getting to the know person. We’ll use the GOAL method to learn about our partners and to write our profiles.

G = Goals: What were your original goals? What are your next goals?

O = Obstacles: What obstacles did you face in accomplishing your goals? What new problems loom?

A = Achievements: What pleasure of problems have these achievements brought?

L = Logistics: What background (logistics of who, what, where, when) led to your current situation?

Example Interview Questions

  1. Describe the activity you selected to discuss. What skills does it involve? How much time does it involve? Who else is involved with you?
  2. How did you get involved in this activity? What made you decide to begin this activity?
  3. Who is a big influence, or mentor, to you in this activity? Your parents? Siblings? Coach? Friend? Pastor? Teacher? How have they mentored you?
  4. Explain a typical ____ (insert activity of story).
  5. What’s been your best experience with this activity?
  6. What’s been your most difficult, disappointing, upsetting experience with this activity?
  7. If applicable, describe a time when you want to quit this activity. Why didn’t you quit?
  8. What advice would you give to someone who is interested in this activity?
  9. Recall a major event or moment from this activity. Please describe why it was a major event and how it impacted you.
  10. What is the best piece of advice that you received about this activity?
  11. What is your best lesson that you’ve learned from this activity?
  12. G for Goals: What were your original goals? What are your next goals? Fast forward a decade with this activity, where are you and what are you doing with this activity.
  13. O for Obstacles: What obstacles did you face in accomplishing your goals? What new problems loom?
  14. A for Achievements: What pleasure of problems have these achievements brought?
  15. L for Logistics: What background (logistics of who, what, where, when) led to your current situation?
  16. Always ask: Do you have anything else to add or that you think others should know?

How Do I Know What To Ask My Partner?

You may be thinking, “This sounds great, but how do I know what to ask my partner? What activity do they want me to ask about?”. That’s where the next activity comes into play.

— Activity: Complete the Short Personality Profile Questionnaire —

Think about an area of your life that you’re passionate about and that you’re comfortable answering questions about. It could be academics, athletics, volunteering, family life, college preparation, career ideas, hobbies, music, dance, politics, personal struggles, entertainment, etc.

Answer the worksheet questions with that passion in mind. Exchange questionnaires.

Start Writing Questions

Here are a few more tips to think about before you write your interview questions:

Ask Explanation-Needed Questions: Don’t just ask, “How old were you when you first realized you wanted to _________?” You’ll get the answer, “A few years ago.” Ask questions that need more explanation, “What inspired you to _________ and when did you make this decision in your life?” You want the person to answer in complete sentences that clearly answer the question, not short phrases.

Ask Again: Don’t be afraid to ask “Why?;” “Please explain that more in-depth.” “Please say that again, I didn’t quite understand the first time.”

Ask Sensory Questions: “Tell me about…”; “What did it sound like when…”; “How did it feel when…”; “What did it smell like…”; “What did it look like when…”; “Describe the scene for me.”

Last Question: Always ask, “Is there anything else I should have asked? Is there anything else you want me to know?”

— Activity: Start writing questions! —

Aim for at least 10-15 interview questions.

Bring Your Audio Recorders and Headphones Tomorrow!!!!!

COJO 3530, Week 12: Social Media

Twitter and social media are not only for self-absorbed celebrities, social-butterfly teenagers, and teaching-absorbed professors communicating with their students (like me).

Twitter and social media are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and social media to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism (watch a quick video about how social media changes news reporting), public relations (watch a quick video from a VP of PR), and advertising (read about how Super Bowl advertising has changed).

Let’s tackle Twitter first. A video introduction.

Some uses:

  • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
  • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • For example, Sara Whittle used this technique to gather information: “Sitting in the Union waiting for all you cowboys to come and tell me “whats your sign” giving away cool stuff.”
  • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
    • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
  • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
    • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
  • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
    • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
    • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
    • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
  • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
    • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. A recent search (i.e., 1 p.m. Aug. 29), found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
    • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. PR instructor Kelli Matthews solicits advice. “Getting some great responses to my question on Quora. What skills do you think PR grads need? http://qr.ae/FS9A”
  • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird.org). Be paranoid about that.
    • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
    • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
    • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
    • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
  • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
    • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

PS – If you’re interested in using Social Media for Activism, please download a PowerPoint presentation that I made to the Good Mule conference in November 2012.

Wyoming Press Association Workshops

I’m excited and honored to present two new-media related workshops to the Wyoming Press Association.

I’ve created a PowerPoint presentation for each workshop. Please download the slides and follow along.

Tech for Web Reporting

Gathering and Promoting News (and Yourself) with Social Media

If you have any questions after the workshops, please contact me via email or Twitter.

Tweeting (Microblogging) for Journalism and Communication

Twitter and Facebook are not only for self-absorbed celebrities. Twitter and Facebook are not only for social-butterfly teenagers. Twitter and Facebook are not only for teaching-absorbed professors communicating with their students (like me).

Twitter and Facebook are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and Facebook to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism, public relations, and advertising.

Some uses:

  • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
  • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • For example, Sara Whittle used this technique to gather information: “Sitting in the Union waiting for all you cowboys to come and tell me “whats your sign” giving away cool stuff.”
  • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
    • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
  • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
    • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
  • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
    • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
    • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
    • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
  • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
    • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. A recent search (i.e., 1 p.m. Aug. 29), found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
    • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. PR instructor Kelli Matthews solicits advice. “Getting some great responses to my question on Quora. What skills do you think PR grads need? http://qr.ae/FS9A”
  • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird.org). Be paranoid about that.
    • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
    • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
    • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
    • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
  • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
    • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

Tweeting and Friending for Journalism & Communication

Twitter and Facebook are not only for self-absorbed celebrities. Twitter and Facebook are not only for social-butterfly teenagers. Twitter and Facebook are not only for teaching-absorbed professors communicating with their students (like me).

Twitter and Facebook are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and Facebook to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism, public relations, and advertising.

Some uses:

  • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
  • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • For example, Sara Whittle used this technique to gather information: “Sitting in the Union waiting for all you cowboys to come and tell me “whats your sign” giving away cool stuff.”
  • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
    • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
  • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
    • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
  • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
    • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
    • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
    • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
  • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
    • For example, there is a live chat on Twitter from 7-8 p.m. tonight (Mon. Jan. 24). Join the conversation by searching for #journchat.
    • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. PR instructor Kelli Matthews solicits advice. “Getting some great responses to my question on Quora. What skills do you think PR grads need? http://qr.ae/FS9A”
  • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird.org). Be paranoid about that.
    • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
    • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
    • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
    • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
  • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
    • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

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