Website Design

A website design course at the University of Wyoming

Tag: branding (page 1 of 3)

Social Media Management for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

How Social Media is Used by the Big Three Media Fields

Social media is for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, or public relations manager, all of these fields rely on social media now.

You can use social media:

  • To help you create a presence and voice
  • To promote your stories or your products
  • To search for story ideas and sources
  • To network with others in your field
  • To engage with your audience, start a conversation

No doubt, social media is changing our media world. Let’s review some resources.

Please choose to review either the journalists, PR, or advertising sections below. Review each link in your chosen section. Write down 3 things that you’d like to share with the class about what you learned from reading these articles in your section.

There are also some helpful hints that could apply to journalism, public relations, and advertising. Keep up to date on these hints for social media at Social Media Examiner. Here are some of the most helpful posts and lessons that I’ve discovered on this website:

Critical Analysis and Comparison of Two Organizations’ Social Media Management

Blog Post #8 Due on Fri. Nov. 4 by 11:59 p.m. | Presentations of Results on Monday and Wednesday

For Blog Post 8, you will write a critical analysis and comparison of two organizations’ social media management styles. Download Blog Post 8 for details. Here’s the short version of the assignment:

  • As you sit down to do your analysis, be sure to review these links above that we’ve reviewed.
  • Use the specific advice offered in these articles as you conduct your analysis.
  • Examine the 6 major social media platforms noted in the assignment: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and LinkedIn.
  • Take notes of your experience. Your notes should be grounded in the advice from the articles. Your notes will be the basis and foundation for your blog post.
  • Answer all required questions in the assignment (broadly speaking, you must compare the organizations’ social media presence, suggest three reasons why each organization is using social media effectively, and three pieces of advice for each organization).

A Focus on Twitter: Basics to Understand Before Your Live Tweeting Assignment (Blog Post #9)

Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).

Establish a voice. There is a lot of noise out there. To get engaged and get noticed, you’ll need to decide what “face” you want to reveal to the Twittersphere.

  • For me, @klandreville, my twitter voice is related to political communication and news research, teaching, and education.
  • For @Anna_Rader, one of our guest speakers, her voice is “NPR junkie, music lover, cinephile, Wyomingite, nerd. Digital Media Coordinator @WYPublicRadio and Digital Producer of @HumaNatureShow. Opinions are my own.”
  • Brainstorm about your Twitter voice.

Once you have a voice and identity in mind, find similar people to follow. To engage with a like-minded community, search for people to follow at “Who To Follow.” Twitter will suggest some people after you write your identity summary and begin posting.

Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.

Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.

  • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.

Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.

  • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.

Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.

  • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
  • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
  • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”

Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.

  • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat.
  • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”

State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.

  • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
  • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
  • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
  • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”

Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:

  • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Crowdsource. Use followers for information. Make a call or solicit them for information.

  • Find anecdotes and exemplars for stories. Denver Post did this to find the human face to their story on parents stealing their childrens’ identities and then raiding their credit.
  • Collect data using Google Docs to create a Google Form. Then, share link on social media for quick, informal surveys. Denver Post used this technique to find people live-blog their responses to the first 2012 presidential debate in Denver.

 

Picture1

The Denver Post crowdsourced for their article on parents stealing their children’s identity.

 

Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

More Advice from Twitter Experts at the BBC Journalism Academy: Below is a summary of the best tips.

  • Keep tweets simple.
  • Promote your content and work. Ask a simple question and link to the content. The idea is to intrigue, not give away all the content.
  • Avoid “clickbait” which is perceived as a marketing ploy and game to people.
  • Do not tweet too much of one side of an argument. It appears as if you are promoting them. Be balanced, even with Twitter content and attention.
  • Do not use too many hashtags (limit to two). It drowns the message.
  • Use images and videos if they add to the content. No stock photos or mundane photos.
  • Be helpful, open, honest and authentic. Be funny (in a professional and clever way) and social.
  • Think dialogue, not monologue.
  • Don’t retweet without reading and checking the retweeted content first.
  • Check the grammar and spelling!
  • “The don’ts? Don’t tweet angry, vengeful or drunk. Always be yourself.”  — @tomfordyce, chief sports writer @BBCSport

Live-Tweeting Practice

We will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Report from a journalistic point of view. Type out your tweets and try to keep them less than 140 characters.

WordPress Setup and Workshop

First, it’s important to know that there are different types of blogs. Let’s visit these examples to see how people in our field are using blogs. Most major news organizations have journalist-authored blogs. For example, The New York Times has a large directory of journalist-authored blogs. My personal favorite is the LENS blog of photojournalism.  There are also many public relations oriented blogs as well: Cision, Bulldog Reporter, and and Holmes Report are a few top PR blogs.

For your blog, you’ll be posting your class assignments here to showcase your journalistic work, but I strongly encourage you to also post your thoughts, comments, goals, brainstorming ideas, etc. on your blog to practice your online writing skills and showcase your media work.

To be more successful with your media career, you need to create a brand for yourself by working hard at creating solid media stories. Let’s read to some branding principles.

Part of creating a brand, or a good reputation, is to know how to showcase your stellar ideas and high-quality professional work. So, feel free to post other professional material or thoughts to your blog, in addition to your required assignments for class.

In the end, you’re competing with hundreds of other students for those media jobs. Let’s take a look at recent journalism job and PR job postings.

So think of your blog as like a continually updated “live” resume and portfolio. Google yourself right now. What website pops up first? If you post to your blog frequently, then your blog may pop up first (which is what you want). You want employers to find your blog when they Google you. So keep updating it!

And you may want to connect your blog to your greater online presence. Post the blog link to your profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and any other online presence you have.

Blogging Workshop

  • Create a WordPress account
  • Create an “about” page
    • Your name.
    • Some demographic information, such as where you are from and what your family is like.
    • What the purpose of this blog is (e.g., it’s to showcase your storytelling work).
    • Some interests and what you like to do in your spare time.
    • Your career goals.
  • Linking to other web pages
  • Posting photos and inserting other media or files

 

Write Your First Blog Post: See Your Blog 1 Assignment

  • Create a new post
  • Using categories
  • Using tags
  • Saving drafts
  • Publishing the post

 

Guidelines To Follow For Blog Writing

  • Update frequently
  • Write in the first-person (i.e., “I think) and use conversation-style that shows your personality
  • Provide specific headlines
  • Provide links elsewhere to helpful information
  • Allow readers to comment and comment back to readers
  • Are ongoing conversations among members of a community
  • Can be your professional portfolio, journal, or brainstorming session
  • Embed photos, video, audio, and other multimedia features
  • Are relatively short, usually less than 800 words

 

IMPORTANT: To log in to your WordPress blog, you can visit your blog url plus a “/wp-admin” at the end of the url. For example, to edit my blog, I go to “http://uwyojournalism.com/wp-admin”.  Alternatively, you can sign in through WordPress.com.

Last points: If you need any help setting up your blog and I’m not available for question, then try an online tutorial.

HSI, Day 7: Ethics of Media Consumerism

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Generation Like, Corporate Marketing, and You

We will watch a PBS Frontline episode about this topic. Then, we’ll write a blog post and discuss.

  • What messages and information do you remember the most from the video? What “spoke” to you as a teen in “Generation Like”?
  • Did anything surprise you about the video?
  • Do you think the practice of integrating advertising/marketing into social media is ethical, appropriate, and acceptable? Or, do you think this practice is irritating, unethical, or inappropriate?
  • Did you know what “selling-out” was before you saw the video? Do you think it’s a problem or a concern? — Check out a music video from a 90’s ska band that is all about “selling-out”. (Silly fact: I saw this band live when I was in college! Lol…)
  • Do you have any other thoughts about the video clips you saw?

Activity: Identifying the Hidden Persuaders in Advertising

Get into groups of 3. Look at the ads. Discuss the advertising techniques used. Discuss with the class.

Techniques:

  1. Bandwagon: Join the crowd. Everyone is buying it/using it/doing it.
  2. Testimonial: A famous person or authority claims the product is good.
  3. Image advertising: A product is associated with certain people, places, activities. The implied message is one of attractiveness, wealth, enjoyment, etc.
  4. Weasel: A promise is implied by using words like “usually” or “chances are.”
  5. Omission: Facts about the product are not told.
  6. Repetition: Saying it again and again.
  7. Scale: Making a product bigger or smaller.
  8. Association: Promising adventure, attractiveness, quality.
  9. Name-calling: Making the product seem better by using unpopular terms about the competition.

 

Basics of SEO & Google Analytics

SEO: Search Engine Optimization

Before we get started: Search for your name again on several search engines. What happens? Do you see your website?

If you don’t see your website yet, then perhaps the search engine spiders need more time to find your content. Or, perhaps you should consider implementing some of the suggestions below that are relevant to SEO.

The purpose of SEO is to:

  • Create a great, seamless user experience.
  • Communicate to the search engines your intentions so they can recommend your website for relevant searches.

What Search Engines Are Looking For

Search engines strive to provide the most relevant results from a user’s search terms. Search engines consider:

  • Title Tags: The title tag is THE MOST IMPORTANT SINGLE TAG in your page. It tells the search engines what your page is about. It is still vitally important to your SEO strategy. If interested, see more information about the importance of title tags.
  • Content: Is determined by the text on the page and the titles and descriptions that are given. Also consider the use of helpful HTML5 elements such as <header>, <nav>, <section>, <article>, <aside>, and <footer>. These elements give your content more meaning and help search engines.
  • Performance: How fast is your site and does it work properly?
  • Authority: Does your site link to authoritative and respectable sites (e.g., government websites, professional media websites)? Or do other authoritative sites use your website as a reference or cite the information that’s available?
  • User Experience: How does the site look? Is it easy to navigate around? Does it look safe? Does it have a high bounce rate?

This information was adapted from SEO Basics: 8 Essentials When Optimizing Your Site.

If you’d like to read a more comprehensive guide to SEO, see Google’s SEO guide, a 32-page PDF document.

Google Analytics

While a healthy SEO strategy gets visitors to your page, relevant and interesting content (and advertising) keeps them on your page. Google Analytics is a free system to help understand your audience and their content interaction.

Online content managers, website administrators, and social media marketers need to understand who is visiting their website, where visitors are coming from, and what content is most popular.

Knowing what content is popular, who is visiting your website, and where visitors are coming from will give you more information to share with potential advertisers and content creators.

Advertisers and content creators can create messages that resonate more with the audience, which will hopefully drive more traffic to your website.

Purpose of Google Analytics:

  • To track page visits from your audience.
  • To track audience demographics.
  • To track *where* your audience came from (e.g., a Google search, Facebook, another website)
  • And, it’s free to use.

Walk-Through of My Google Analytics Account

Before we sign up your website for Google Analytics, I’ll walk you through my account.

Key areas to examine:

  • Audience –> Overview
  • Behavior –> Overview

If you have a WordPress blog, you can also use a Google Analytics plugin to track your blog. I use Google Analyticator.

Example Job Description that Uses Google Analytics: Wyoming Public Media’s Website Coordinator Job Call

$41,400 minimum salary

Essential Duties

  • Produce high-quality original content for WPM’s internet and social media channels. Plan, design, develop, test, write/edit copy and documents. Utilize web-based software tools for managing web content.
  • Serve as liaison with NPR Digital and other public broadcasting e-media systems and services. Stay abreast of industry e-communication software tools, management techniques, and e-trends that increase usage. Understand and apply industry and FCC broadcast regulations.
  • Coordinate with WPM Engineering/Technology department in areas of mobile apps, streams, and analytics. Work with News and Programming/Production areas to maximize multi-platform dissemination of content.
  • Coordinate and implement marketing and promotional efforts through a variety of platforms. Design digitized images, banners, charts, e-newsletters, image maps and other graphics to enhance appearance of site, support management communication tools, and to increase overall e-traffic.
  • Plan and maintain social media activity and increase WPM’s social media presence, crowd-sourcing potential and two-way conversation with community interest groups.
  • Record, edit, compress, transcode audio and video for Web and mobile.
  • Provide technical troubleshooting and support for Web and mobile. Communicate with users to incorporate user needs, industry best practices, and correct problem situations.
  • Recommend equipment and software purchases that encourage content innovation and performance efficiency.

Minimum Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s level degree and two years of experience as a webmaster/content developer or equivalent combination of education and experience.
  • Working knowledge of public media industry initiatives in digital media.
  • Deep knowledge of industry e-communication software tools, management techniques, and e-trends that increase usage, including audio, video, and photos.
  • Understanding of industry and FCC broadcast regulations and regulations governing use of digital content.
  • Excellent communication skills across multiple platforms with strong writing and editing abilities.
  • Strong organizational skills and ability to produce content with quick turnaround.

Desired Qualifications

  • Ability to produce compelling original work for web and social media.
  • Ability to collaborate with colleagues and to take direction from supervisors.
  • Ability to multi-task and shift priorities as needed.
  • Deep knowledge of the NPR Digital system.

Guided Signup: Visit Google Analytics to get started. I will guide you through the process.

You should have a Google account to complete this activity. The purpose of this exercise is to understand how to set up a Google Analytics account and what Google Analytics does for you.

Key Points

  1. SEO should be a strategy that you thoughtfully create and implement on your website.
  2. Google Analytics is a free service that allows you to understand your audience and how your audience interacts with your website.
  3. If you plan on keeping your website in the long term, then you should implement the suggestions raised in this lecture, and also consider learning more about these strategies through your own research.
  4. You can certainly include this information on a resume (i.e., that you have basic understanding of SEO and Google Analytics).

Be prepared and be open to learning new skills relevant to SEO and website analytics. If you’re interested in a career in new media, then you need to be flexible, adaptable, and willing to learn new skills, services, and software.

Internship: Student Writer for Division of Kinesiology and Health

The Division of Kinesiology and Health is looking for a student writer in for our newsletter. I believe this job will provide your students with an ideal opportunity to share expertise, practice the skills, and contribute to the public media of the university.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any question, thanks!

*******************************************

Qin (Arthur) Zhu / Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Perceptual-Motor Behavior Laboratory

Division of Kinesiology and Health

College of Health Sciences

University of Wyoming

Laramie, WY 82071

Office: Corbett 111

Phone: 1-307-766-5752

Fax: 1-307-766-4098

Email: qzhu1@uwyo.edu

Webpage: http://www.uwyo.edu/kandh/faculty-staff/Q_Zhu.html

Internship: Graphic Design for UW Institutional Marketing

GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN/ASSISTANT

Graphic design intern/assistant wanted as support for University of Wyoming Institutional Marketing. We are looking for a bright, motivated and creative individual who wants hands-on graphic design experience. Duties will include both web and print graphics. Must have a firm understanding of graphic protocol for each platform.

Required skills/qualifications:

  • Experience in industry standard software: Adobe Creative Suite: primarily InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator skills also desired
  • Willingness to take direction and respond well to advice and creative notes
  • Good organizational skills and detail-oriented
  • Able to think resourcefully, creatively and proactively while working within an established brand standards manual.
  • Must be able to meet deadlines!
  • Junior/senior standing preferred but not necessary.

Please submit three samples of design and corresponding source files work and three work-related references.

This is a part-time, unpaid internship opportunity for college credit.

For consideration, contact Patrick Owen, Institutional Marketing Graphic Designer at powen@uwyo.edu by Feb. 17, 2015

Social Media Apprenticeship Opportunity

Bright Agrotech, LLC is looking for a volunteer intern to assist with social media. Check out the details.

 

Job and Internship Fair

Fall Job & Internship Fairs:

Business, Government, Non-Profit, Agriculture Monday, October 6

(STEM) Science Technology Engineering & Math Tuesday, October 7

100 employers will be on campus over two days seeking qualified students 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. in the Union Ballroom.  

Come prepared with

  1. resume (have it reviewed by the Center for Advising and Career Services)
  2. a positive, friendly attitude,
  3. knowledge about the companies that you wish to speak with,
  4. 1-2 minutes of “talking points” about why you’re interested in their company, and
  5. several reasons how your communication and media background can help their company.

 

Featured Employers:

  • Denver Police Department
  • Menards
  • Peace Corps
  • Union Pacific
  • U.S. Senator John Barrasso
  • USDA Ag Statistics Service
  • WestCare
  • Yellowstone Boys & Girls Ranch

 

Job Search Prep Session- Tuesday, September 30

Drop-in Time- 4-5:30 p.m. Union Ballroom

Resume Reviews, Practice Interviews, Job Fair Tips

Call (307) 766 2398 for more information. uwyo.edu/cacs

prep session

Twitter and Social Media for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

Twitter and social media are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and social media to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism (watch a quick video about how social media changes news reporting), public relations (watch a quick video from a VP of PR), and advertising (watch a video about the challenges of social media advertising).

Let’s tackle Twitter first. A video introduction.

Some uses:

    • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
    • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
      • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
    • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
      • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
    • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
      • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
      • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
      • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
    • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
      • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. I searched this recently and found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
      • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”
    • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see Topsy and SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.
      • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
      • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
      • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
      • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
    • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
      • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”
    • Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

PS – If you’re interested in using Social Media for Activism, please download a PowerPoint presentation that I made to the Good Mule conference in November 2012.

WordPress Setup and Workshop

First, it’s important to know that there are different types of blogs. Let’s visit these examples to see how people in our field are using blogs.

 

For your blog, you’ll be posting your class assignments here to showcase your journalistic work, but I strongly encourage you to also post your thoughts, comments, goals, brainstorming ideas, etc. on your blog to practice your online writing skills and showcase your media work. See this wake-up call for online journalists! Moreover, you need to create a brand for yourself by working hard at creating solid journalism and media stories. Part of creating a brand, or a good reputation, is to know how to showcase your stellar ideas and high-quality professional work. So, feel free to post other professional material or thoughts to your blog, in addition to your required assignments for class.

In the end, you’re competing with hundreds of other students for those media jobs. Let’s take a look at recent journalism job and PR job postings.

So think of your blog as like a continually updated “live” resume and portfolio. Google yourself right now. What website pops up first? If you post to your blog frequently, then your blog may pop up first (which is what you want). You want employers to find your blog when they Google you. So keep updating it!

And you may want to connect your blog to your greater online presence. Post the blog link to your profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and any other online presence you have.

Blogging Workshop

  • Create a WordPress account
  • Create an “about” page
    • Your name.
    • Some demographic information, such as where you are from and what your family is like.
    • What the purpose of this blog is (e.g., it’s to showcase your storytelling work).
    • Some interests and what you like to do in your spare time.
    • Your career goals.
  • Linking to other web pages
  • Posting photos and inserting other media or files

 

Write Your First Blog Post

  • Create a new post
  • Using categories
  • Using tags
  • Saving drafts
  • Publishing the post

 

Guidelines To Follow For Blog Writing

  • Update frequently
  • Write in the first-person (i.e., “I think) and use conversation-style that shows your personality
  • Provide specific headlines
  • Provide links elsewhere to helpful information
  • Allow readers to comment and comment back to readers
  • Are ongoing conversations among members of a community
  • Can be your professional portfolio, journal, or brainstorming session
  • Embed photos, video, audio, and other multimedia features
  • Are relatively short, usually less than 800 words

 

IMPORTANT: To log in to your WordPress blog, you can visit your blog url plus a “/wp-admin” at the end of the url. For example, to edit my blog, I go to “http://uwyojournalism.com/wp-admin”.  Alternatively, you can sign in through WordPress.com.

Last point: If you need any help setting up your blog and I’m not available for question, then try an online tutorial.

Older posts

© 2017 Website Design

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑