Media Literacy, Blogging, & Photography

UW High School Institute

Tag: advertising (page 1 of 2)

HSI, Class 10: Snowy Range Photos, Media & Body Image

Photo Editing

A popular open-sourced photo-editing and graphic design application is GIMP.  Another one is Pixlr, which has a helpful web application for photo editing. I will experiment with Pixlr for now. Here are some important basic terms with photo editing.

Cropping: Crop to ensure that only one clear subject exists. You can crop to ensure the photo fits a certain aspect ratio (e.g., 150 pixels height by 350 pixels width).

Resizing: Sometimes, you’ll need to resize your photo in order to make it fit a certain area.

Image Adjustments: My favorite is Contrast, but play around with them to get the look you want to achieve, without over-doing it and changing the essence of the photo.

Just because you can edit your photos, doesn’t mean that you should. If you’re engaging in photoJOURNALISM, then you want to capture the photo in a way that does not require editing. However, if you do edit, be sure you follow good common sense and do not go past the ethical boundaries of photojournalism.


Snowy Range Photography

Post your top 5-10 Snowy Range Mountains photos and write a blog post about your experiences on yesterday’s field trip.


Media Literacy: Media & Body Image

Females, Media, and Body Image

Take a look at these magazine covers.

 bodyimage

The average female is 5’4 and 165 lbs, yet the average female model is 5’10 and 120 lbs.

But, this ideal female body image has not been stable throughout history. There have been periods when both thinner and fuller female body shapes have been idealized. This website documents some of the various idealized female body types. What is interesting is that many idealized body types have been dictated by men (e.g., religious figures, artists, movie producers, politicians, philosophers). Keep that in mind as we go through more content below.

In modern culture, beauty is often airbrushed; Photoshop or another photo editing program are regularly used to change models’ appearances.

Males, Media, and Body Image

The average male is 5’9 and 195 lbs, yet the average male model is at least 6’0 and weighs about 175 lbs.

A Culture Obsessed with Appearance

Our culture places an emphasis on female empowerment through sexuality above most other qualities, such as intelligence, strength, spirituality, etc.

Why does media perpetuate these body image ideals?

Advertisements and media imagery play on our insecurities to make money. Magazine, TV, and billboard images create a false idea of what we should look like, and this false advertising can make people feel bad if they don’t look like that. Thus, they hope to sell their products and *make money*.

If our society was completely confident and happy with how we looked, then we wouldn’t buy stuff that claims to help improve our bodies. At the same time…we live in a consumer-oriented capitalist economy and people have their own free-will to perpetuate the cycles of insecurity and spending money to fix the insecurities. 

What are your thoughts and your experiences? I want to learn from YOU now!

Blog Post on Media and Body Image

Please write a blog post that discusses these questions:

  1. Describe some examples of media images that are problematic for girls/women and boys/men. What does the media “say” girls/women and boys/men should look like?
  2. To what extent is it realistic for everyone to achieve the looks of models and celebrities in the media? Imagine if everyone was the same as the ideal body image perpetuated in the media. What would that mean for our society?
  3. Have you or your friends ever been affected by media images? How so?
  4. List three things the media can do to change the promotion of an ideal body image.
  5. List three things that you can do to promote acceptance and appreciation of unique qualities in others.

Creating a Healthy Body Image

People differ in a wide variety of ways (e.g., eye color, weight, height, skin color, hair, likes/dislikes, abilities, interests).

Some things we can change through effort (e.g., studying, practicing), and some things we can’t change even if we want to (e.g., height, skin color).

Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses as well.

Let’s take a look at some critical views about media and body image. Advice for girls. Advice for boys.

 Take home points:

  1. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses.
  2. We are all different in terms of our physical appearance, which makes us unique.
  3. Each of us should focus on staying healthy, being the best we can be, and showing respect for others and their abilities.
  4. There is no ideal body image. Everyone should strive to be physically, emotionally, and socially “fit” and happy.
  5. With maturity comes the capacity to think about how our actions toward others make them feel.
  6. And as we learn to think for ourselves, we are better able to cope with how we perceive others view us.
  7. Do not fall trap to media expectations of how you should behave. Value yourself not on your appearance; rather, value yourself based on your intelligence, kindness, empathy, friendliness, talents, etc.
  8. Demand that other people value you on more than just than your appearance.

Social Media Management for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

How Social Media is Used by the Big Three Media Fields

Social media is for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, or public relations manager, all of these fields rely on social media now.

You can use social media:

  • To help you create a presence and voice
  • To promote your stories or your products
  • To search for story ideas and sources
  • To network with others in your field
  • To engage with your audience, start a conversation

No doubt, social media is changing our media world. Let’s review some resources.

Please choose to review either the journalists, PR, or advertising sections below. Review each link in your chosen section. Write down 3 things that you’d like to share with the class about what you learned from reading these articles in your section.

There are also some helpful hints that could apply to journalism, public relations, and advertising. Keep up to date on these hints for social media at Social Media Examiner. Here are some of the most helpful posts and lessons that I’ve discovered on this website:

Critical Analysis and Comparison of Two Organizations’ Social Media Management

Blog Post #8 Due on Fri. Nov. 4 by 11:59 p.m. | Presentations of Results on Monday and Wednesday

For Blog Post 8, you will write a critical analysis and comparison of two organizations’ social media management styles. Download Blog Post 8 for details. Here’s the short version of the assignment:

  • As you sit down to do your analysis, be sure to review these links above that we’ve reviewed.
  • Use the specific advice offered in these articles as you conduct your analysis.
  • Examine the 6 major social media platforms noted in the assignment: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and LinkedIn.
  • Take notes of your experience. Your notes should be grounded in the advice from the articles. Your notes will be the basis and foundation for your blog post.
  • Answer all required questions in the assignment (broadly speaking, you must compare the organizations’ social media presence, suggest three reasons why each organization is using social media effectively, and three pieces of advice for each organization).

A Focus on Twitter: Basics to Understand Before Your Live Tweeting Assignment (Blog Post #9)

Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).

Establish a voice. There is a lot of noise out there. To get engaged and get noticed, you’ll need to decide what “face” you want to reveal to the Twittersphere.

  • For me, @klandreville, my twitter voice is related to political communication and news research, teaching, and education.
  • For @Anna_Rader, one of our guest speakers, her voice is “NPR junkie, music lover, cinephile, Wyomingite, nerd. Digital Media Coordinator @WYPublicRadio and Digital Producer of @HumaNatureShow. Opinions are my own.”
  • Brainstorm about your Twitter voice.

Once you have a voice and identity in mind, find similar people to follow. To engage with a like-minded community, search for people to follow at “Who To Follow.” Twitter will suggest some people after you write your identity summary and begin posting.

Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.

Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.

  • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.

Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.

  • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.

Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.

  • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
  • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
  • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”

Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.

  • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat.
  • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”

State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.

  • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
  • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
  • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
  • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”

Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:

  • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

Crowdsource. Use followers for information. Make a call or solicit them for information.

  • Find anecdotes and exemplars for stories. Denver Post did this to find the human face to their story on parents stealing their childrens’ identities and then raiding their credit.
  • Collect data using Google Docs to create a Google Form. Then, share link on social media for quick, informal surveys. Denver Post used this technique to find people live-blog their responses to the first 2012 presidential debate in Denver.

 

Picture1

The Denver Post crowdsourced for their article on parents stealing their children’s identity.

 

Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

More Advice from Twitter Experts at the BBC Journalism Academy: Below is a summary of the best tips.

  • Keep tweets simple.
  • Promote your content and work. Ask a simple question and link to the content. The idea is to intrigue, not give away all the content.
  • Avoid “clickbait” which is perceived as a marketing ploy and game to people.
  • Do not tweet too much of one side of an argument. It appears as if you are promoting them. Be balanced, even with Twitter content and attention.
  • Do not use too many hashtags (limit to two). It drowns the message.
  • Use images and videos if they add to the content. No stock photos or mundane photos.
  • Be helpful, open, honest and authentic. Be funny (in a professional and clever way) and social.
  • Think dialogue, not monologue.
  • Don’t retweet without reading and checking the retweeted content first.
  • Check the grammar and spelling!
  • “The don’ts? Don’t tweet angry, vengeful or drunk. Always be yourself.”  — @tomfordyce, chief sports writer @BBCSport

Live-Tweeting Practice

We will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Report from a journalistic point of view. Type out your tweets and try to keep them less than 140 characters.

HSI, Day 7: Ethics of Media Consumerism

Class Discussion & Blog Post: Generation Like, Corporate Marketing, and You

We will watch a PBS Frontline episode about this topic. Then, we’ll write a blog post and discuss.

  • What messages and information do you remember the most from the video? What “spoke” to you as a teen in “Generation Like”?
  • Did anything surprise you about the video?
  • Do you think the practice of integrating advertising/marketing into social media is ethical, appropriate, and acceptable? Or, do you think this practice is irritating, unethical, or inappropriate?
  • Did you know what “selling-out” was before you saw the video? Do you think it’s a problem or a concern? — Check out a music video from a 90’s ska band that is all about “selling-out”. (Silly fact: I saw this band live when I was in college! Lol…)
  • Do you have any other thoughts about the video clips you saw?

Activity: Identifying the Hidden Persuaders in Advertising

Get into groups of 3. Look at the ads. Discuss the advertising techniques used. Discuss with the class.

Techniques:

  1. Bandwagon: Join the crowd. Everyone is buying it/using it/doing it.
  2. Testimonial: A famous person or authority claims the product is good.
  3. Image advertising: A product is associated with certain people, places, activities. The implied message is one of attractiveness, wealth, enjoyment, etc.
  4. Weasel: A promise is implied by using words like “usually” or “chances are.”
  5. Omission: Facts about the product are not told.
  6. Repetition: Saying it again and again.
  7. Scale: Making a product bigger or smaller.
  8. Association: Promising adventure, attractiveness, quality.
  9. Name-calling: Making the product seem better by using unpopular terms about the competition.

 

Internships at UW

Nick Popplewell of UW Athletics needs some social media and marketing interns for fall.

UW Media Relations (Milton Ontiveroz) needs one intern.

iMix 96.7 needs an intern for sales.

Internship: Student Writer for Division of Kinesiology and Health

The Division of Kinesiology and Health is looking for a student writer in for our newsletter. I believe this job will provide your students with an ideal opportunity to share expertise, practice the skills, and contribute to the public media of the university.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any question, thanks!

*******************************************

Qin (Arthur) Zhu / Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Perceptual-Motor Behavior Laboratory

Division of Kinesiology and Health

College of Health Sciences

University of Wyoming

Laramie, WY 82071

Office: Corbett 111

Phone: 1-307-766-5752

Fax: 1-307-766-4098

Email: qzhu1@uwyo.edu

Webpage: http://www.uwyo.edu/kandh/faculty-staff/Q_Zhu.html

Internship: Advertising/Research

Advertising / Research Intern for Appaloosa Broadcasting

The intern would help us research companies before initial contact, write scripts for ads, help with production of advertising and help us prepare proposals that will then be taken out to real life clients for presentation.

Contact:

Lars Sturlin
GSM
Appaloosa Broadcasting
307-745-5208

Twitter and Social Media for Journalism, PR, and Advertising

Twitter and social media are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager. You can use Twitter and social media to help you create a presence and garner an audience. No doubt, social media is changing journalism (watch a quick video about how social media changes news reporting), public relations (watch a quick video from a VP of PR), and advertising (watch a video about the challenges of social media advertising).

Let’s tackle Twitter first. A video introduction.

Some uses:

    • Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).
    • Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.
    • Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.
      • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.
    • Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.
      • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.
    • Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.
      • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake last January, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
      • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
      • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”
    • Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.
      • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. I searched this recently and found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
      • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”
    • State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see Topsy and SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.
      • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
      • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
      • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
      • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”
    • Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:
      • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”
    • Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

Now start connecting, start following, start tweeting, start your social media presence!

PS – If you’re interested in using Social Media for Activism, please download a PowerPoint presentation that I made to the Good Mule conference in November 2012.

Campus Activities Center Marketing Intern, Spring 2014

Campus Activities Center Marketing Intern, Spring 2014

The Campus Activities Center in the Wyoming Union has the following student employee job opening. Interested individuals need to submit a résumé and cover letter detailing work and involvement history and how it relates to this position.  Departmental approval is needed to get internship credit.

Deadline for applying is Friday, November30th by 5:00 p.m. MST and should be emailed to Rachel Nedved at rnedved@uwyo.edu.

Campus Activities Center Marketing Intern (Hiring 2 Positions)

Hours – Approximately 8-10 hours a week, renewed on a semester basis

THIS IS AN UNPAID INTERNSHIP

Job duties include:

  • Assist Marketing Coordinator with marketing and promotions of Campus Activities Center (CAC) events, specifically for Student Activities Council (SAC) and Friday Night Fever (FNF) weekly events.
  • Assist Marketing Coordinator in developing a comprehensive marketing plan for these programs.
  • Assist Marketing Coordinator with market research geared towards gaining a better understanding of student programming interests and effective and efficient marketing strategies. Research conducted using a variety of methods that will include survey tools and focus groups.
  • Assist in developing and overseeing social media marketing, including the management of a Facebook and Twitter account.
  • Develop a strong understanding of new technologies and their use for marketing and advertising.
  • Coordinate with SAC and FNF committees to implement marketing for each weekly event.  This will include weekly tabling in the Union, Washakie and other buildings on campus.
  • Assist in developing and implementing programming board recruitment campaigns.
  • Attend weekly meetings with Marketing Coordinator and CAC staff.

HSI, Day 9: Digital Media & Multitasking, HSI Photography Review, & Flickr

Class Discussion & Blog Post

Today we’ll watch a clip from a Frontline documentary about the impacts and implications of digital media use. After the clip, please answer the following questions:

  1. To what extent do you multitask with media during school? Do your teachers allow it?
  2. How about when you’re outside of school; do you multitask with media?
  3. Do you think you’re effective at multitasking? Why or why not?
  4. After watching this clip, do you anticipate multitasking in the future during school? Why or why not?
  5. What are the implications or consequences of multitasking with digital media? Do you see problems for society or for yourself?

HSI Photography: Progress Update

Download your photos and let’s take a look. As I walk around and chat to students about their photography, please talk in small groups with your classmates about your photography.

Photography: Review of Creative Devices

We will go over the creative devices again if I feel it is appropriate and would be helpful.

Flickr Slideshows

Let’s set up our Flickr accounts so we can upload our photos! We will learn how to create a “set” of photos that we can embed into our WordPress blogs. This way, you can share your HSI experience with everyone using your photos.

 

Network at the Wyoming Press Association’s Student Meet-and-Greet

I strongly encourage you to go to the Wyoming Press Association‘s student meet-and-greet this Friday at 5 p.m. at the Hilton on Grand Avenue. It’s in the convention area’s meeting rooms.

Wyoming newspaper publishers, journalists, editors, and advertising executives will be there to specifically talk and meet students who are interested in the field.

This is a great opportunity to discuss internship possibilities and job prospects at Wyoming newspapers!

Please bring several copies of your resume.

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