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An Exercise in Juggling: Live-Tweeting Speeches

20 Nov

Now that you know more about how to use social media for storytelling, we are going to live-report a newsworthy event using Twitter.

Think of this exercise as an exercise in juggling. You have to watch, listen, type (or write), and tweet. This is preparation for your live tweeting assignment. Let’s take a look at the Blog Post 9 – Live Tweeting Project

It will be helpful to do a few practice runs first. Let’s watch Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Speech.

First, open a Word file. I want you to type as much as information, notes, and direct quotes that you can from the speech. You may even write the tweets during the speech. But try not to miss anything!

Then, we’re going to take class time to create as many 140-character tweets as possible (with the hashtag #SteveJobs included in each tweet). Highlight the first sentence or two in your file. Is it 140 characters? How should you edit it? Is it important enough to tweet?

Aim for at least 10 tweets, but more is better. If this was a live event, your audience would want as many direct quotes from Jobs as possible.

After you’re done, we’ll share our tweets as a class by going around the room. This should give you an idea of the key moments of the speech. And you should double-check to ensure you captured those key moments of the speech in tweets you have written in your Word file.

This exercise should help you understand the process of live-tweeting.

If we have time, we will practice live-tweeting another speech: Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality to the UN.

Also, be sure that you charge your smartphone before attending the event. If your phone runs out of battery and you’re supposed to be live-tweeting an event, that is no excuse to a boss in the future.

 
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Posted in COJO 3530, social media

 

Job Opportunities for Making Social Change

19 Nov

**Post-Graduation 2015 Job Opportunities Making Social Change**

We’re looking for smart, hard-working students who work well in a team and are eager to make real change after graduation.

The Fund for the Public Interest (­“the Fund”) partners with leading nonprofit groups from around the country, providing the kind of people power it takes to build organizations for the long-term, win hard-fought campaigns, and make real change on some of the most important issues of our day. And we’re hiring!

Specifically, we’re hiring Citizen Outreach Directors to run our grassroots campaign offices across the country next fall — working on behalf of groups like Environment America and US PIRG.

We are looking for smart, motivated students who want to get their hands dirty and make a real impact on some of the most critical issues facing our society.

If you are interested in applying, visit our website at www.fundjobs.org, or contact me directly at jobs@fundstaff.org

I’m looking forward to speaking with you more about our positions!

Kate Fielding

 
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Posted in media careers

 

Multimedia and Study Abroad Opportunities

19 Nov

If you are interested in multimedia and would like to study abroad, check out this program. There are opportunities in Ireland, Turkey, Italy, Israel, Spain, and more. Some of these opportunities sound like great experiences!

Be sure you consult with the UW Study Abroad Office if you’re interested in studying abroad.

 
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Posted in media careers

 

Social Media Apprenticeship Opportunity

18 Nov

Bright Agrotech, LLC is looking for a volunteer intern to assist with social media. Check out the details.

 

 
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Posted in media careers

 

Twitter for Journalism, Promotion, and Engagement

18 Nov

How Social Media is Used by the Big Three Media Fields

Twitter and social media are for you. The aspiring journalist, sports commentator, marketing executive, advertising director, public relations manager.

You can use Twitter and social media to help you create a presence and garner an audience.

No doubt, social media is changing our media world. Let’s watch the videos and talk about each one.  Then, after the videos, pick one of the online stories to read: journalism, public relations, and advertising. Please be ready to share a few things you learned from the particular story you read.

 

Because most of you are already familiar with Facebook, we will focus on Twitter. However, most of the advice and tips in this lecture also apply to Facebook as well.

Twitter: A video introduction.

Know the basics. @username, #topic, and RTs (retweets).

Establish a voice. There is a lot of noise out there. To get engaged and get noticed, you’ll need to decide what “face” you want to reveal to the Twittersphere.

  • For me, @klandreville, my twitter voice is related to political communication and news research, teaching, and education.
  • For @Anna_Rader, one of our guest speakers, her voice is “NPR junkie, music lover, cinephile, Wyomingite, nerd. Online Manager and Production Assistant at @WYPublicMedia.”
  • Brainstorm about your Twitter voice.

 

Once you have a voice and identity in mind, find similar people to follow. To engage with a like-minded community, search for people to follow at “Who To Follow.” Twitter will suggest some people after you write your identity summary and begin posting.

Share and gather information. For professional use, you can use it to quickly share and gather information real-time (e.g., promote events) with people interested in your writing, journalism, company, etc. Retweet relevant information to your field as well. Retweeting build followers.

Brand management. You can use it to hear and address praise and complaints about your writing or company. Search for your favorite (or least favorite) companies to see how they’re using Twitter and Facebook.

  • For example, Southwest is known for their fantastic customer service. Twitter and Facebook only help that image.

 

Contribute to the community. Actively search and share information related to your field. Followers will be happy and more informed. And they may retweet, which brings you more followers.

  • For example, AEJMC (a nonprofit mass media association) shares valuable information about journalism, multimedia, public relations, and advertising to followers.

 

Start a story and use visual writing. Live events can be tweeted and facebooked while on the scene. Stories you’re working on can be previewed with tidbits and snippets of writing. Direct people to the full story. Use strong verbs, adjectives, and visuals.

  • For example, Joanna Smith, a Toronto Star reporter covering the Haitian earthquake, wrote a series of earthquake-related tweets. She created an unraveling narrative through each snapshot.
  • “Was in b-room getting dressed when heard my name. Tremor. Ran outside through sliding door. All still now. Safe. Roosters crowing.”
  • “Fugitives from prison caught looting, taken from police, beaten, dragged thru street, died slowly and set on fire in pile of garbage.”

 

Engage with the community. There are live chats via Twitter. It can be a learning environment. Retweet all relevant information to your field.

  • For example, there are live chats on Twitter about journalism. Search for #journchat. I searched this recently and found that people were sharing the information that LinkedIn is the top social media website for journalists because it’s easy to network professionally and keep tabs on potential news sources. If you’re an aspiring journalist, you should strongly consider getting a LindedIn account. It’s a popular way to learn about potential jobs too.
  • For example, ask questions relevant to your field. Laurel Papworth (@SilkCharm) asked, “Dear #PRChat PR people how is #BigData affecting your industry relationships with journalists? #Journchat #RunningScaredYet? :P”

 

State your opinions, but be professional. Everything you say on Twitter can be retweeted (unless you have your settings on private). Facebook profiles can be viewed (and I assume that they can be hacked too). Everything lives forever online. All of your tweets can be searched (see Topsy and SnapBird). Be paranoid about that.

  • For example, one student was tweeting about dislike of a professor’s course and the professor engaged the student to suggest what the professor should improve. You be the judge about the conversation tone.
  • Student Tweets: (1) UUUGGGGHHHHHH She is working my nerves!! I hate new professors!! (2) I swear [professor’s name] is too much for me! (3) Soooo I can’t talk too bad about my professor on twitter anymore…because now we have to follow her ass!!
  • Professor: @StudentName After reading your multiple tweets about your disappointment in my teaching style, what would you recommend I do differently?
  • Her follower responded: Double yikes! I hope your student realizes you are also followed by PR execs who make hiring decisions…”

 

Represent. One tip from Intel Corporation’s social media guidelines:

  • “Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as an Intel employee, you are creating perceptions about your expertise and about Intel by our shareholders, customers, and the general public-and perceptions about you by your colleagues and managers. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your work and with Intel’s values and professional standards.”

 

Crowdsource. Use followers for information. Make a call or solicit them for information.

  • Find anecdotes and exemplars for stories. Denver Post did this to find the human face to their story on parents stealing their childrens’ identities and then raiding their credit.
  • Collect data using Google Docs to create a Google Form. Then, share link on social media for quick, informal surveys. Denver Post used this technique to find people live-blog their responses to the first 2012 presidential debate in Denver.

 

Picture1

The Denver Post crowdsourced for their article on parents stealing their children’s identity.

 

Social Media Management. Monitor social media across Twitter and other platforms with the following tools:

 

More Advice from Twitter Experts at the BBC Journalism Academy: Below is a summary of the best tips.

  • Keep tweets simple.
  • Promote your content and work. Ask a simple question and link to the content. The idea is to intrigue, not give away all the content.
  • Avoid “clickbait” which is perceived as a marketing ploy and game to people.
  • Do not tweet too much of one side of an argument. It appears as if you are promoting them. Be balanced, even with Twitter content and attention.
  • Do not use too many hashtags (limit to two). It drowns the message.
  • Use images and videos if they add to the content. No stock photos or mundane photos.
  • Be helpful, open, honest and authentic. Be funny (in a professional and clever way) and social.
  • Think dialogue, not monologue.
  • Don’t retweet without reading and checking the retweeted content first.
  • Check the grammar and spelling!
  • “The don’ts? Don’t tweet angry, vengeful or drunk. Always be yourself.”  — @tomfordyce, chief sports writer @BBCSport

 

If we have time, let’s examine the Blog Post 9 – Live Tweeting Project.

Next time, we will register for our Twitter account. And, we will conduct a live-tweeting practice session in our classroom.

 
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Posted in COJO 3530, social media

 

Snowy Range Academy, 1st Grade: Egyptian Hieroglyphics

07 Nov

Egyptian Hieroglyphs

Where is ancient Egypt on a map?

egypt-map

Ancient Egyptian Map For Kids 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How long ago did the ancient Egyptians live and write these hieroglyphs?

About 3,000 to 750 B.C.

hieroglyph-louvre

How long ago did the ancient Egyptians live and write these hieroglyphs? — About 3,000 to 750 B.C.

 

 

People thought they were pictures that represented an idea, which is called a logogram.

They thought a picture of a crocodile meant “evil” and a picture of a hawk meant “fast.”

crocodile-kom-ombo-temple-546986

They thought a picture of a crocodile meant “evil.”

Hieroglyphs-Horus-Temple-Edfou-245311

They thought a picture of a hawk meant “fast.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What would you think a picture of an owl could mean? What about a picture of a scarab?

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-egyptian-owl-image17530219

What would you think a picture (or logogram) of an owl could mean?

Scarab Hieroglyph

What would you think a picture (logogram) of a scarab could mean? Scarabs are a type of beetle in ancient Egypt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The people who thought that certain pictures meant certain ideas were not entirely wrong.

In fact, Egyptian hieroglyphs are a mixture of logograms and phonograms.

What are phonograms?  — They represent a sound. On this purple sheet and below are some phonetic hieroglyphs.

EgyptianHieroglyphs1

Phonetic hieroglyphs represented sounds.

 

Egyptians also used logograms in their writing.

Remember that logograms are not phonetic and do not represent a sound.

Instead, logograms are pictures that represent ideas and stand for words.

Below are examples of logogram hieroglyphs.

logograms

Logogram hieroglyphs represented ideas and things.

 

 

 The Rosetta Stone

It took a very long time to figure out what Egyptian hieroglyphics meant.

Researchers finally understood the hieroglyph writing when they found the Rosetta Stone in 1799.

French soldiers in Egypt found the Rosetta Stone in the town of Rosetta, near the Nile River.

The Rosetta Stone is a slab (piece) of granite stone that weighed almost a ton (2,000 pounds) and was almost as tall as some of you (about 4 feet).

rosetta_stone

The Rosetta Stone had three different scripts, or types of writing, on it: Greek, cursive hieroglyphics, and regular hieroglyphics.

Researchers deciphered (figured out) what Egyptian hieroglyphs meant because they compared the writing they did know (Greek) to the writing they didn’t know (hieroglyphics).

rosettawriting384

A close up photo of the Rosetta Stone. Greek is at the bottom and hieroglyphics is at the top.

 

 

Writing Hieroglyphics

Usually, hieroglyphs were written and read from right to left, opposite of what we do now.

What are the names of people who could read and write in ancient Mesopotamia?

That is the same name for people who could read and write in ancient Egypt as well.

scribe02

A sculpture of an Egyptian scribe.

 

 

 Papyrus

They wrote on papyrus, which was made from the papyrus plant.

What did the ancient Mesopotamians use to write and what did they write on?

What type of material do you think lasts longer though time and is stronger? Which is more fragile?

g_q_papyrus_westcar_01

 

We know more about the ancient life of Mesopotamia than Egypt because papyrus didn’t last as long through time.

How do you think future people and civilizations will learn about us? Where and what do we write on?

 

 

Your Turn

Let’s write our names in hieroglyphics now.

 
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Posted in Uncategorized

 

Look, Listen, Tell, and Show: Soundslides Assignment

06 Nov

Soundslides: Audio + Photos

When you gather audio and photos for a news story, you are making the story more marketable. And as our guest speakers have told us, telling stories in multiple ways makes the story more accessible to your audience. Your story can now be told with images, with sound, or with both. Not only will you have captions for your photos, but you’ll have a voice and ambient noise that compliment the captions.

We’ll be working with Soundslides to combine our audio and photography skills. You’ll be working in groups to get an idea of how to balance everything. It will help to have one person focusing on photography and one person on audio. However, in a future job position, you may to do both tasks, so don’t neglect learning about your partner’s task. Don’t be afraid to make suggestions or comments to your partner if you think it will improve the story. At the end of the experience, ask your partner for their advice and tips so that you can excel at the task you didn’t do this time around.

The topic can be on anything! It can be about sports, science, the environment, technology, health, politics, economics, community affairs, the university, or a personality profile.

For story ideas, you can check out UW’s calendar of events, UW’s public outreach, UW’s news and announcements, WyoVocal, The Branding Iron, and the Laramie Boomerang. The story does not have to be university-related, but that’s where many of you may want to start brainstorming.

Basically, you’re doing an audio story with photos. The audio should tell the story in an engaging way and your photos and captions should compliment your audio story. Of course, your audio story should answer the the who, what, where, and when. But, more importantly, your audio should relay information that is compelling and emotional. It should also tell us how and why. It should make us think and feel the story.

Remember that the audience is more forgiving with the photography compared to the audio. If the audio is done poorly with harsh edits and a confusing storyline, then the audience loses interest and forgets about the great photos you have.

The captions should have all the essential information of the photo: who, what, where, and when. A reader should be able to read the captions and understand the basics of the story without listening to the audio.

Let’s take a look at the Blog Post 8 – Soundslides Project assignment details.

Examples

Here are some student examples of Soundslides stories.

Brooke Eades (The Nutcracker)
Egla Negussie (Dangers of I-80)
Dyann Diercks (UW band)
Jessica Romero and Hailey Hawkes (about Roller Derby)

Tips for Gathering Audio and Photos

When you’re on-location and reporting the story, you should consider what to gather first: the audio or the photos. Of course, if you go to report the story with your partner, then you both can get started at the same time. The photographer can take relevant photos while the audio journalist interviews the subject.

However, when you are working alone in the future…

Collect the photos first if:

  1. You think the light is perfect
  2. You think the light will soon fade
  3. You think the subject is quiet and needs to loosen up before the audio interview
  4. You want to get a feel for the subject’s job, hobby, etc. before interviewing them about it.

 

Collect the audio first if:

  1. You find the subject is nervous about getting their picture taken
  2. The subject is very chatty and is eager to talk with you
  3. The light is not great and you want to wait to see if the light improves

 

When working alone, you have to accept the fact that you’ll probably miss a great photo while gathering audio, and you’ll likely miss a great quote while gathering photos.

And that’s OK.

More tips to remember for gathering photo and audio together:

Gather more information than you think you need.
If you need to gather a second round of photos, then don’t be afraid to do so. If you need to re-interview the subject after first collecting audio and then taking photos, then don’t afraid to ask for 5 more minutes of their time.

Importance of matching photos with audio.
If you collect a great quote, then be sure to also get supporting photos for the quote. If you collect a great photo, be sure to gather audio from the subject that is related to the photo.

Plan for having one photo for every 7 to 9 seconds of audio.
That will help you determine how many great shots you need while on assignment. Thus, for a 2-minute story, you’ll need about 15 photos on the screen for 8 seconds each. For a 3-minute story, you’ll need about 22 photos. And for a 4-minute story, you’ll need 30 photos. For this assignment, your story needs to be between 2 and 4 minutes.

Keep track of what you shoot and what you record.
If you get a photo of a truck driver starting up his semi, then collect audio of the hum and roar of the semi’s engine. Finally, record the truck driver’s answer to your question of how he copes with the loud noises associated with trucking.

You’ll notice that some of your photos lead to more interview questions and ideas of what kind of audio to collect. You’ll notice that some of your audio and ambient noise lead to more photo ideas.

This blog post was based on MediaStorm’s tips on collecting audio and photos. Check them out for more information.

And please see the Soundslides tutorial on YouTube if you need help with the technology. Here’s another help page for Soundslides as well.

Download a free trial of Soundslides so you can work from home, too.

 
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Posted in assignments, audio, COJO 3530, photography

 

Gathering Audio – The Artform

28 Oct

Audio Interviewing Tips

Gathering audio that is clean, clear, and crisp is no easy task. This post outlines some hints for you to consider before you conduct audio interviews. It is developed from the hints listed on MediaStorm’s audio training page.

Know Your Equipment: Be comfortable operating your audio recorder. You should know where the buttons are without looking at it. You should know what all of the buttons do. If you’re uncomfortable with the audio recorder, your subject will be as well.

Location: Find a quiet location with little background noise. Find a spot with soft surfaces that absorb sound. A couch or fabric chair is better than a wooden chair. Cover a table with a blanket. A car with closed windows is a great location. Avoid hallways and large rooms that echo.

No Ambient Noise During Interview: While you do want to use ambient noise in your audio story, you don’t want the ambient noise to interfere with the person speaking to you. Avoid consistent background noise by picking a small quiet room with carpet and soft chairs. If using the TASCAM, try using to foam covering to see if it helps quiet ambient noise. You want to collect ambient noise separately and not fight it during the interview.

If Ambient Noise is Unavoidable: Press the record button before you begin the formal interview. Allow the recorder to collect the ambient noise without anyone’s voices interrupting the ambient noise. This gives you clean ambient noise to insert into any pauses during the editing process.

Get Close: Put the microphone about 2 inches away from the person’s mouth if you’re recording at a moderate “rec level” (about 5-7 on the TASCAM). You can put the microphone farther away if you’re recording at a higher “rec level” (about 9-10). Remember though — when editing, it’s easier to bump up the volume than bump down the volume. Thus, err on the side of caution and do not record at a level that is TOO LOUD.

Use Headphones: Put your headphones into the headphone jack on your digital audio recorder. Hit the “record” button. Now ask the person to talk. Ensure that you can hear the person clearly. If you can’t hear them clearly, put the microphone closer to their mouth and/or increase the “rec level” to a higher sensitivity. Keep the headphones on your ears during the whole interview. You’ll know exactly how the person sounds the whole time.

Speak Up: Ask the person to speak up and speak louder if you can’t hear them properly and clearly when you have your headphones on.

Don’t Fidget: Do not fidget and play with the audio recorder while gathering sound. The audio recorder picks up the noise when you rub your hands on it. Avoid this by not fidgeting.

Focus: There’s many things to think about while conducting an audio interview. Can you hear them clearly? What are they saying? What’s my next question? Where is the interview going? How can I take the interview in a different direction or somewhere I hadn’t planned if they say something interesting?

But Also Engage: Listen to the person. Make eye contact (don’t look at their mouth). Seem genuinely interested in their story. After they’re done speaking, stay in silence for a moment. They may add more detail to their thoughts. Empathize with them. Share information about yourself with them. This will help them ignore the microphone and their surroundings.

Uh huh: Don’t do it. Avoid saying those filler words during an interview. You don’t want YOUR voice recorded when the person is talking. Instead, nod, smile, use eye contact, and learn forward to encourage the person.

Avoid Comment. Resist the urge provide in-depth responses or comments to your interviewee during and after everything he/she says–that means more editing for yourself or not being able to use the audio at all.

Pause. During the audio interview, leave a brief pause after the interviewee finishes answering a question and before you begin your next question. Giving more pause will leave you more room for editing.

Ask Explanation-Needed Questions: Don’t just ask, “How old were you when you first realized you wanted to be a journalist?” You’ll get the answer, “I few years ago.” Ask questions that need more explanation, “What inspired you to become a journalist and when did you make this decision in your life?” You want the person to answer in complete sentences that clearly answer the question, not short phrases that may need a narrator’s explanation.

Ask Again: Don’t be afraid to ask “Why?;” “Please explain that more in-depth.” “Please say that again, I didn’t quite understand the first time.”

Ask Sensory Questions: “Tell me about…”; “What did it sound like when…”; “How did it feel when…”; “What did it smell like…”; “What did it look like when…”; “Describe the scene for me.”

Last Question: Always ask, “Is there anything else I should have asked? Is there anything else you want me to know?”

There is no better way to learn audio reporting than by trying it out for yourself!

 

Audio Editing Tips

Consider these audio editing suggestions.

  1. Decide how you want to organize your story before you begin editing; know what the beginning, middle, and end should be before you begin editing.
  2. The end should bring closure and finality to the interview topic. Don’t end with a statement that leads to more questions from the listener.
  3. Use the zoom feature extensively during your editing, it really helps get the cut to be as flawless as possible.
  4. There are two ways to edit audio: Build or destroy. To build while editing, take a blank audio track and then create an interview from the original. To destroy while editing, take the original interview and cut it down.
  5. While editing, write down the points in the track that you’re working on. That way when you go back and listen to it, you can listen for the cut/transition and move things around faster by referencing those breaks in your notes.
  6. Always save the original audio file separate from the file that you’re currently editing. Also consider saving “editions” of your audio file such that each audio editing session that you engage in is a unique file. That way, if you make a grievous error, then you can revert to the next most saved/updated/edited file.

 

 
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Posted in audio, COJO 3530

 

Marketing/PR Director Opportunity

24 Oct

“Officer Position Available”

Your Non-Traditional Student Council is currently searching for candidates for the Newly Created Position of “Marketing/PR Director”.

Great Opportunity for the right individual to put their talent & newly learned skills to work with a fast growing and successful organization.

To be considered for this position please email: ntsc@uwyo.edu.

Proposed Responsibilities  of the NTSC Marketing/PR Director:

– The Marketing/PR Director reports to the President and is a voting member of the Officers.  They are responsible for the following:

  1. Maintaining all NTSC logos and marketing materials used in the promotion of the NTSC.
  2. Overseeing the creation and sending of all emails out to the NTSC List-serve using successful email marketing techniques.
  3. Responsible for the marketing image of the NTSC.
  4. Making posts to and updating material on any established NTSC social media.
  5. Forming and overseeing the NTSC Marketing/PR committee each academic year. This committee is to be comprised of volunteers to help meet the responsibilities of the Marketing/PR Director. Volunteers can be students, local Laramie residents, businesses as well as other university groups and student RSO’s.
  6. As this is a new position the Council will be looking for the new director’s input in finalizing the responsibilities of the position.

Like us at: https://www.facebook.com/NTSCUW

 
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Posted in media careers

 

Haub School Photo Contest

21 Oct

Share your best photos that highlight our environment or natural resources. Open to all UW Students.

For submission requirements and deadlines, visit uwyo.edu/haub

 

 
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Posted in photography